K.J. Parker Bibliography

Trilogies

The Fencer Trilogy

Colours in the Steel (1998)

The Belly of the Bow (1999)

The Proof House (2000)

The Scavenger Trilogy

Shadow (2001)

Pattern (2002)

Memory (2003)

The Engineer Trilogy

Devices and Desires (2005)

Evil for Evil (2006)

The Escapement (2007)

Standalone Novels

The Company (2 October, 2008)

The Folding Knife (22 February, 2010)

The Hammer (5 January, 2011)

Sharps (5 July, 2012)

Savages (31 July, 2015)

Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City (9 April, 2019)

*Forthcoming Spiritual Sequel to Sixteen Ways

Serial Novels

The Two of Swords

  • 1 (21 April, 2015)

  • 2 (21 April, 2015)

  • 3 (21 April, 2015)

  • 4 (12 May, 2015)

  • 5 (16 June, 2015)

  • 6 (14 July, 2015)

  • 7 (18 August, 2015)

  • 8 (15 September, 2015)

  • 9 (13 October, 2015)

  • 10 (10 November, 2015)

  • 11 (15 December, 2015)

  • 12 (12 January, 2016)

  • 13 (16 February, 2016)

  • 14 (15 March, 2016)

  • 15 (15 April, 2016)

  • 16 (5 September, 2017)

  • 17 (12 September, 2017)

  • 18 (19 September, 2017)

  • 19 (26 September, 2017)

1-8 Collected in The Two of Swords: Volume 1 (17 October, 2017)

9-15 Collected in The Two of Swords: Volume 2 (14 November, 2017)

16-19 Collected in The Two of Swords: Volume 3 (12 December, 2017)

Short Fiction 

(Red = Can be found in Academic Exercises, Blue = Can be found in The Father of Lies)

(Italicized items are novellas, items “In Quotes” are short stories)

Purple and Black (30 July, 2009)

“A Rich Full Week” (June, 2010)

“Amor Vincit Omnia” (July, 2010)

Blue and Gold (31 December, 2010)

“A Small Price to Pay for Birdsong” (12 January, 2011)

“A Room with a View” (April, 2011)

“Let Maps to Others” (July, 2012)

“One Little Room an Everywhere” (October, 2012)

“The Dragonslayer of Merebarton” (May, 2013)

“The Sun and I” (July, 2013)

“Illuminated” (July, 2013)

“I Met a Man Who Wasn’t There” (January, 2014)

“The Things We Do for Love” (August, 2014)

“Heaven Thunders the Truth” (2 October, 2014)

“Safe House” (7 October, 2014)

“No Peace for the Wicked” (6 August, 2015)

The Last Witness (6 October, 2015)

“Told By an Idiot” (4 February, 2016)

Downfall of the Gods (31 March, 2016)

“Priest’s Hole” (1 December, 2016)

  • Available in Five Stories High

The Devil You Know (1 March, 2016)

“Message in a Bottle” (14 March, 2017)

Mightier than the Sword (30 June, 2017)

“The Best Man Wins” (10 October, 2017)

  • Available in The Book of Swords

“Rules” (31 January, 2018)

  • Note: Debuted in The Father of Lies

“The Thought That Counts” (26 April, 2018)

  • Available in Beneath Ceaseless Skies #250

“The Return of the Pig” (16 October, 2018)

  • Available in The Book of Magic

Portrait of the Artist” (26 September 2019)

  • Available in Beneath Ceaseless Skies #287

My Beautiful Life (November 2019)

Prosper’s Demon (28 January, 2020)

Forthcoming Short Fiction (7 July 2020)

  • Available in The Book of Dragons 

Essays

On Sieges

Cutting Edge Technology

Rich Men’s Skins

Collections

Academic Exercises (27 July, 2014)

The Father of Lies (31 January, 2018)

Some Words on K.J. Parker

K.J. Parker kept his true identity secret for 17 years.  Bread crumbs were left throughout (i.e. it was announced at one point that Parker was already an established author before picking up the pseudonym).  In 2015, Tom Holt revealed himself to be Parker to the surprise of many fans (though others managed to guess it years before the reveal).  Many believed Parker to be a woman, to which Holt declares was a two-pronged, intentional subterfuge on his part: 1) To further throw people off his trail, and 2) As a nod to the several female authors who inspired him in his youth (C.J. Cherryh, Mercedes Lackey, Leslie Fish, and others)

The initials “K.J.” come from the initials of a person who taught Tom Holt metalworking, while “Parker” is a literal brand of pens.  Initially, Parker donned the pseudonym because he might not have been taken as seriously if everyone knew a comic fantasy writer was trying his hand at serious historical fantasy.

In terms of his process, Tom Holt (as K.J. Parker) has been interviewed on the subject.  Apparently, how he approaches most of his writing is that he plots out most if not all of the major events that happen to his characters. What often surprises him, however, is how the characters wind up reacting to their trials and tribulations.

It should also be noted that Tom Holt considers all of his works as Parker to be existing in the same world, unofficially known as Parkerland. Subtle references to characters or places from previous works pop up frequently in Parker’s newer pieces.

Much of what has been stated on this page can be heard in The Coode Street Podcast Episode 230.

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