Main document

Vigilante

Vigilante – noun 

[?v?d?.??l?n.ti]

A person who tries in an unofficial way to prevent crime, or to catch and punish someone who has committed a crime, especially because they do not think that official organizations, such as the police, are controlling crime effectively. Vigilantes usually join together to form groups.

Introduction

What you are reading at this moment is a roleplaying game where the players take on the role as masked crimefighters in a modern city-scape. These vigilantes are seemingly normal people who hide their identities in order to fight for a cause. They will have to fight, to chase, to run and not get caught themselves. Will the vigilantes succeed in dealing out their own brand of justice or will they be branded as lunatic criminals themselves? That is your story to tell.

The Basics

Rolling dice

This game uses six-sided dice(from here on to be called d6) for all the mechanics of the game. Most often you will be asked to roll 2d6, but some parts will just require 1d6. Abilities can also let you roll more than two. Both players and the game master (Here on known as GM) will roll for actions and compare the results, letting the GM narrate what happens from the outcome. Some optional rules lets the GM roll less and lets him/her focus on the part as narrator and game-referee.

Taking action

When a character performs an action with an uncertain outcome, the player rolls 2d6 and adds any bonuses or penalties from any applicable traits. The result is compared to either a fixed number representing the difficulty called target number (TN) or an opposed roll from an opposing character. A higher result than the TN or the opposed roll means that the action is successful.

Target numbers

A target number represents the difficulty of a certain action, TNs ranging from 8 to 10 should be used in majority, while 11 to 14 should be on the harder spectrum and 15 to 17 should be used for what is extreme and heroic.

Traits

Skills

A skill is a general field of competence and cover many usages. When performing an action it will use one of the skills that is applicable and get a bonus or penalty to the roll depending on its modifier.
A skill range in modifier from -3 to +5 with the low extreme representing being really bad or abysmal, and the higher end being outstanding in that field. A 0 in a skill represents being average in general in that field and gives no bonus or penalty.


The skills are:
Athletics: Ruling over most physical exertions, be it running, jumping, climbing and swimming.
Fighting: Covering the characters general aptitude in combat, be it in close-quarters or at a distance, attacking and defending, tripping and grappling, and when you act.
Subterfuge: The skill that covers things like stealth, be it moving silently or unseen and hiding. It can also cover lying, picking locks, forgery and pickpocketing.
Tinker: Rules over craftsmanship, being generally handy in most kinds of trades like technology, vehicles, electricity and computers, but also first aid, fixing or sabotaging things.

Knowledge: The skill that covers general knowledge on various fields in the world, and how up to speed on the world around the character you are as well as memory.

Vigilance: The skill for being on your guard. It covers areas like awareness, seeing through a lie, noticing tiny details, hidden things or general foresight.

Specializations

A specialization is a focused expertise in a field of a certain skill mentioned earlier. When a specialization is applicable it gives a bonus to the action, this bonus ranges from +0(Non-existent specialization) to +5(Master).


Examples of specializations are:
Running, Swimming, Climbing, Jumping, Balance and Tumbling (Athletics).
Melee-attack, Ranged attack, Defense, Grabbing, Tripping and Initiative (Fighting).
Moving silently, Moving unseen, Bluffing, Sleight of hand, Lockpicking and Hiding (Subterfuge).
Machines, Vehicles, Computers, First aid, Sewing and Carpentry (Tinker).
History, Law, Local, Crime, Chemistry and Medicine (Knowledge).

Searching, Awareness, Body-language, Reading faces (Vigilance).

If you have an idea for a specialization that is not on this list, check with your GM and come up with something together.
If you perform an action and it is unclear if a specialization is applicable, ask before you add the bonus to the roll.

Abilities

Abilities affect the game in other ways than skills and specializations do. Some abilities can affect an outcome by circumstantial bonuses or give new mechanics outside these basic core rules.

Other traits

Gear – A vigilante should not be unprepared or empty-handed. Gear helps out in ways no skill can, and make some skills possible to perform.

Attack – The total of the bonuses from Fighting and applicable Specializations for the characters most often used attacks in combat.

Damage – The bonuses from gear and abilities to a successful attacks damage against an opponent.

Protection – The penalties from gear and abilities to a successful attacks damage against the character. 

Teamwork

A character can aid another character on a test and by doing so gives a +2 bonus to the roll.

A character must either spend an action, forego participating in the test or have succeeded on the same test before using teamwork.

Combat

If you’re in the crime-fighting business you better be prepared to be fighting and facing people willing to take you down as well.

Initiative – Deciding the order of action

Combat is split into rounds, where each participant in the combat scene acts in their turn. In order to know who acts first and in subsequent order, all participants roll 2d6 adding modifiers from Fighting as well as the Initiative specialization. Write order as well as results on a list, ordering them from high to low. The initiative-score can change during play, and hence the order.

Raising the initiative-score

A character can spend an action in order to raise their initiative-score by 2.

Actions

During a characters turn they have two actions to spend. An action can be used to move, attack, defend, trip, grab, defend, aim, prepare an action to happen outside the normal order, and more. Actions such as attacking, grabbing or tripping can only be used once per turn.

Delaying

A character may choose on their turn to delay their actions on this turn and instead act after someone else in the order. The actions must happen before the end of the round or the actions will be considered forfeit. After delaying, move the characters place in the order to after the character he/she started acting after, with the same initiative result as that character.

Preparing an action

A character can spend an action on their turn by declaring what they will do(move, attack, etc.) and when(after a specific character has acted, when a certain condition is fulfilled). If this action is not made before the beginning of the characters next turn, it will be considered forfeit.

Attacking

Close range attack

The attacking character rolls 2d6 and adds any bonuses from fighting as well as a fitting melee attack specialization. The target of the attack rolls 2d6 adding any modifiers from their fighting-skill as well as defense specialization. If the attackers roll is equal or higher to the defense: the attack hits, proceed to damage. The attacker must be in close range in order to attack.

Ranged attack

The attacking character rolls 2d6 and adds any bonuses from fighting as well as any ranged attack specialization, be it throwing or shooting and subtracts it with any modifiers such as cover, range and visibility.The target of the attack rolls 2d6 adding any modifiers from the defendants fighting-skill as well as the defense specialization. If the attackers roll is higher the attack hits: proceed to damage.

Ranged attack modifiers:

Target outside of effective range: -2

Target in close range: -2

Target prone: -2
Target prone and in close range: +2
Target behind cover: -2
Target behind full cover: impossible to attack
Clear visibility: +-0

Hindered visibility (Darkness, thick fog etc.): -2
Blinded: -6

Optional rule: Only players roll
Using this rule only the players roll for attacks during combat. That means that they roll to attack and they roll to defend when being attacked. When rolling to defend using this rule, the TN is 8+ the attackers fighting skill as well as appropriate attack specialization. The TN to successfully attack using this rule is 6+ the defendants fighting skill and specializations such as block or dodge.

Damage

When an attack hits, take the result of the attack-roll add the attacks damage-bonus then subtract it by the result of the defense-roll and the defendants protection-score. The total of this becomes the Damage-score. Damage-score decides what table for possible outcomes of the attack the attacker will roll on along with how the damage was made as there is different types of damage. Roll a d6 on the decided table to see the outcome of the attack.

Some characters are classified as Thugs, thugs automatically take the 6-result on the damage-table.

Optional rule: Use attack-roll for damage
Instead of making a separate die-roll for damage on a successful attack, you use one of the dice used for the attack-roll. If both dice show even or odd results at the same time, you use the highest die-result. If not, you use the lowest. This rule can speed up combat by requiring one less roll for a successful attack. If used in combination with the optional rule: only players roll, use the players defense-roll instead, where you use the highest die-result unless both dice show even or odd results.

Effects of damage

The following are the levels of damage that can be dealt to a character: Bruised, Scratched, Staggered, Stunned, Fractured, Bleeding and Incapacitated.

Bruised and Scratched:

Bruised and Scratched are the same type of injury mechanically with just a difference in name for flavor. A character that gets bruised and/or scratched gets a -1 on all checks/attacks/defenses for each step of bruised/scratched the character has until the beginning of his/her next turn.
A bruise and scratch takes a few days to completely heal.

Staggered:

Staggered is a heavy blow to the character, making the rest of the of the battle harder to continue, be it getting the wind knocked out of you, getting numb in a limb, wobbly knees, or even a concussion. A character that is staggered suffers a sustained -2 penalty to all checks/attacks/defenses until able to rest and recuperate. Any additional steps of staggered counts as being stunned.

Being staggered requires the character to rest a day or two, possibly more than ten.

Stunned:

Being stunned means losing the capability to act for a short time, losing control of the situation. A character that is stunned must spend his/her next action to get rid of the stun before doing anything else. A character can have more than one stun on him/her at the same time, each requiring spending an action to remove them separately.

Fractured:

Cracked, splintered, snapped, broken, fractures are a major injury. A character with fractured suffers a -5 penalty to fitting checks, attacks and defenses depending on where the fracture is, and a -3 penalty to any other checks, attacks and defenses. If a character has more than one fractured active at the same time, raise the penalty by one step. A fracture with the correct medical attention takes circa 3 to 10 weeks to heal correctly.

Bleeding:
Bleeding is a different beast than other types of injury in that it is a static measure that gives the character the effect of blood-loss. When afflicted with bleeding, it raises the bleeding-level by 1, 3 or 5. At the end of the characters turn, they will have to roll on the bleeding-damage table for their level of bleeding. Lower levels of bleeding can easily be stopped by applying pressure to the wound by bandages and the like while higher will without expert medical attention lead to fatal consequences.

Incapacitated:

The character is either knocked out or dead, depending on where the incapacitated character is hit and with what.

Special damage effects

Some hits may target certain areas and have special effects because of this. The following are examples and proposals of such effects, though coming up with more effects outside of these are encouraged if fitting. To let these effects come into play is often at the hands of the GM.

Blinded:

The character is unable to see and has a -6 penalty to making ranged attacks as well as making Vigilance-checks. The character also has a -2 penalty to close ranged attacks as well as defenses and any checks that seem fitting to be affected by ones ability to see.

Deafened:

The character is unable to hear and suffer a -4 on Vigilance checks. The character also cannot gain benefit of any bonus from someone using coordinator on them.

Recovering

While recovering during a combat encounter is difficult if not impossible, if you survived there are some things that can be recovered from or its effects mitigated.

Bleeding:
During combat a character can spend two(2) actions to try and lower the bleeding on either themselves or a nearby person. Make a fitting roll decided by the GM, most likely tinker: firsst aid or knowledge: medicine; depending on the result of the check the bleeding is lowered by a certain amount, Bleeding cannot be lower than 0.

Result:

Bleeding lowered by:

8+

1

10+

3

12+

5

In order to make this roll materials such as bandages from a first aid-kit or more improvised materials is required. Using improvised materials gives the check a -2 penalty.

Fractured:
While a fracture cannot be recovered from quickly, it’s effects can be somewhat mitigated, as well as making sure it will recover in the correct way.
A check can be made (TN:10) in order to make a splint, with the right materials. This lowers the specific penalty from being fractured from -5 to -3, the general penalty is still in place. Multiple fractures will still keep the general penalty higher than -3, even after being seen to.

Grabbing

During combat instead of making a melee attack with a close opponent, a character has the option to instead try to grab the opponent. It is a roll like a melee attack using the grabbing specialization. The defender may block, dodge, or try to grapple back in response using his/her grab specialization. If successful the opponent is considered grabbed. If the target used their grab specialization to defend and successfully defended, the attacker is considered grabbed instead.
A character needs at least one free hand to grab someone.

Grabbing damage

If you have an opponent grabbed, you may spend an action to put him/her in a submission-hold on order to harm the opponent. Once again roll an attack using the grab specialization, it can only be defended by the grab specialization as well. If the attack is considered successful, check the grabbing damage-lists.

Tripping a grabbed opponent

If you have an opponent grabbed you get a +2 bonus to your tripping attempt. If you wish to continue grabbing the opponent after tripping him/her, you will be considered prone as well, but avoid any risk of damage.

Escaping a grab

If a character is grabbed, he/she can spend an action to get out of the grab. Roll a defense-check using the grabbing specialization. If the roll is higher than the opponent's competing attack, you have grabbed the opponent instead. If you only wish to escape the grab you get a +2 bonus to the roll. A grabbed opponent cannot spend an action to move.

Being grabbed

When grabbed a character gets a -1 to any melee attacks against opponents other than the grabber, ranged attacks are more than likely impossible. The character also gains -1 to defense against any attacks.

Tripping

If engaged in close quarters with an opponent, you can choose to trip the opponent instead of attacking him/her. Make a normal attack using the tripping specialization, the opponent can defend with block or dodge specializations. If successful the opponent is prone.

Tripping damage

If a tripping attempt is successful, the target may take damage from such an attempt. Check for the damage-degree as you would a normal attack and subtract 2. Damage by being tripped is considered blunt.

Being prone

A prone character gets a -2 to any close quarter attack as well as -2 to defense against close quarter attacks from any opponent not prone. A prone character is harder to hit with a ranged attack however, but that is covered in the ranged attack table. A prone character must spend two actions in order to move one range. A prone character can spend an action in order to not be prone.

Aiming

A character can spend an action to aim before making a ranged attack. When aiming the character gets a +2 bonus to his/her next ranged attack. The character must declare who he/she is aiming at. The character must make his/her ranged attack after aiming unless continuing to aim. A character has the choice to spend more than one action aiming, if so the character gets another +1 bonus to the ranged attack for every action spent aiming after the first, for a maximum bonus of +4. If the target the character is aiming at is made incapacitated or disappears, making a ranged attack impossible, the aiming is made moot.

Defending

A character can spend an action to focus on their defense, giving block and dodge a +2 bonus until their next turn or next possible action, whichever comes first.

Movement and ranges

A character can spend an action to move one range. The ranges are Close, Near, Far and Very Far. These ranges are relative to every character in the combat, and moving within the same range requires no action. How to measure a range depends on the context of the situation and where the action takes place. Close range can be anywhere from 0 to 5 meters of distance between two characters, basically how much ground can be covered in about a second. Near range is circa 6 to 14 meters, Far is 15 to 30, and Very Far is anything outside Far range. These ranges are best hand-waved.

Obstacles

Sometimes a combat-scene can have set-pieces that stand in the way for movement. What would otherwise have been a distance covered in an action now needs two or simply making it impossible. Some set-pieces, like a fence or a car, can hinder movement unless you decide to roll to overcome it in a certain way, usually with a roll using athletics. These kinds of set-pieces can also act as cover for a character.

On the run

There are times when a criminal the Vigilantes meet won’t try to fight the vigilantes.
Sometimes the Vigilantes may be on the run as well, from law enforcement as well as overwhelming numbers on the opposing side.
If one part is trying to run away while another is trying to catch up, look no further.
These rules are mostly applicable of chases on foot, but can be used if one or both uses bicycles, skateboards, but motor-vehicles are possible with some configuration.
These rules also go in depth of these situations, and can give more lengthy scenes. If this is not what you want at all or don’t think is required for a certain scene, you might opt for a simpler and faster contested roll between the runners and chasers.

The acceleration-die

First and foremost, let’s introduce a new mechanic for these kinds of checks: the acceleration die. The acceleration-die is a static d6 that is unique to every participant in the chases. The acceleration die starts for most characters with the face showing “1”, actions and reactions can lower or raise this number this number. Every round of the chase the acceleration-die is raised by one step.  For every even number the acceleration-die shows, the character gets a +1 bonus to getting away or catching up, for a total bonus of up to +6 when the acceleration-die shows “6”. The acceleration-die cannot go higher than 6.

Victory conditions

When using the rules for being on the run, consider the conditions of success for each part.
If a part succeeds 5 times, no matter the amount, the part wins the chase. If a part succeeds 3 times by an amount of three(3) or more, the part wins the chase. If a part succeeds by an amount of five(5) or more the part wins instantly.
Other victory conditions for the runner can be by making it impossible for the chaser to follow, such as becoming unseen by hiding, making the chaser lose track, or something else, like jumping on the subway right before the door closes.
Extra victory conditions for the chaser would be making it impossible for the runner to escape, such as incapacitating the runner, letting the runner go into a dead end or simply knocking the runner down and grabbing him/her.

Actions

Before a test a runner or chaser may take these actions to affect the outcome of the chase. A success can lead to the opponent having to make a certain check in order not to be hindered or affected by some penalty, while a failure can lead to a temporary setback for the taker of the action. Some actions may lead to an automatic failure on someone's behalf, but a roll still needs to be made to see if the automatic victor of the roll would’ve won by a certain amount even without the automatic success. These actions are examples of what the runners and chasers can try to do, but both parts can act outside of these, it’s up to the GM and the players how that would be ruled, with the following actions as guidelines.

Set the pace

The character can use their action to roll their acceleration-die. The result is what the acceleration-die will stay at. From that point the acceleration-die cannot go up down from any action or at the end of a round. The character can use Set the pace more than once, however each time after the first the character must add one more die to the roll and use the lowest.

Sudden turn

The runner makes a sudden and hard turn, using either Athletics or Subterfuge for a contested roll against either the chasers Athletics or Vigilance. Both parts use their acceleration-die bonus as a penalty for the roll but can lower their acceleration-die by one(1) step to ignore the penalty(impossible for those who have used the action to “set to action”).


If chaser win by 3 or more: Raise chasers acceleration-die by two(2) steps.
If chaser win: Nothing happens.
If chaser lose: Lower chasers acceleration-die by two(2) steps.
If chaser lose by 3 or more: Chaser automatically loses next contest for catching up.

Bring them down

This action requires that the Chaser has a lead in victories in either tier for catching up. The chaser makes a dash to get close to and trip or grab the runner. The chaser makes either a tripping or grabbing attack against the runners defense of choice. Both parts can use their acceleration-die bonus for this contest.


If chaser win by 3 or more: The chaser immediately wins the chase, if there are more runners you only win against this runner.
If the chaser win: Runner automatically loses next contest to get away.
If the runner win: Nothing happens.
If the runner win by 3 or more: Lower chasers acceleration-die by two(2) steps

Create obstacle

The runner makes the chasers goal harder to achieve by getting something in the way. The runner makes a roll using either athletics or vigilance in order to create this obstacle.


If the runner makes a roll with a total of 10 or more: The obstacle has a difficulty-TN of 12.
If the runner makes a roll with a total of 8 or more: The obstacle has a difficulty-TN of 10.
If the runner makes a roll with a total of 7 or less: No obstacle is created, lower runners acceleration-die by two(2) steps.

Obstacles

Whether running away or chasing someone, some things can get in your way. Things like traffic, garbage-cans in the way, fences or vast leaps. Most of these require only an athletics-roll using specializations like climbing, running or jumping. Depending on the obstacle, it is possible to lower the TN. The TN can be by lowering your own acceleration-die where the TN is lowered by two(2) for each step the acceleration-die is lowered. The TN can also be lowered by the obstacle requiring another roll using the same specialization or another like tumbling if jumping over a fence or a vast leap.

Suggested outcome of a roll facing an obstacle:

If obstacles TN is overcome by 3 or more: The obstacle is overcome, raise acceleration-die by one(1) step.

If obstacles TN is overcome: The obstacle is overcome.

If obstacles TN is higher than result of the roll by 2 or less: The obstacle is overcome, lower acceleration-die by two(2) steps.

If obstacles TN is higher than result of the roll by 3 or more: The obstacle is not overcome, automatic failure on the next roll to get away or catch up.

This is just a template for an obstacle. Depending on what the obstacle is, a different outcome may come from the result. Other results may be taking damage, or completely failing the chase.

Social interaction

Some of you might have noted that there really isn’t any skills or specializations for social interactions, save for to lie, to spot a lie and abilities that make the character vaguely better at being convincing or intimidating at times. This is on purpose.

When characters interact, it will be through the players and the GM that gives them voices and letting them decide how to react, no rolls required. Actions outside of words such as lifting someone over the edge of a tall building in order to threaten them during an on-the-spot interrogation may require a roll though. Such actions should be taken into account by the GM for how the recipient reacts, if they’re afraid or convinced or the like.

The abilities Convincing and Intimidating should not be seen as worthless investments though. They are meant for the players that may have issues speaking or express themselves and should be taken in consideration.
But like everything else, some NPCs may not react to attempts to intimidating or coercion. For some it is because they do not feel a threat or deal has enough weight behind it to take into consideration, some because of pure stubbornness or other mindsets, some because there are other things to take into account for them, no person the Vigilantes interact with will react exactly the same to them. And the actions of the Vigilantes would most likely be something the characters they meet take into memory and consideration for later interactions should they meet again.

Character creation

Concept, reasons and secrets

When creating your vigilante for the game, some questions must be answered, be it written down, in talks with the GM and the rest of the players, or just you and the GM. Questions such as:
– How would I describe my character? What is the concept?

– What defines my character?

– Why did my character become a Vigilante?

– What does my Vigilante do to solve problems?

– How does my Vigilante face conflicts?
– What does my character do when acting as a vigilante?

– How does my Vigilante hide their identity?

– What would happen if my characters identity got revealed?

Other questions, such as personality, age, gender, appearance and social status will be answered as well during creation. However answering the following helps you give an outline for how the character should be defined in the mechanics of the game.

Keys

Write down 3 to 5 or more phrases that describe the character, these are your key points, keywords or guidelines to your character and helps knowing what to expect of the character for all the other players as well as the GM.
Keys can be statements such as: Know-it-all, To the point or Has a thousand questions.
Writing these out and defining what they mean will help everyone get a feel for what the group-dynamics are and what to expect not from the players and characters but the group as a whole.

Bonds

Bonds is what ties the character to the outside of their life as a vigilante. It can be things like family, work and colleagues or partners. Write up bonds to your vigilante and give them a value from one to three. The higher the value you give the bond the more you want that bond to come up and the more trouble it can give you. Define together with your GM how your bonds can come up and what trouble they can bring. A total value in bonds of six is recommended in order for the life outside of being a vigilante to shape the game but not fully take over as well as everyone having the same chance to let their vigilantes personal-life be in the limelight.

Making a vigilante

A vigilante consists of traits such as skills, specializations and abilities but also the gear they use. In order to decide these traits and derived traits, the player spends points on their character. A character starts a 0 in everything and without abilities or gear before spending points to raise or acquire these traits.
We recommend that a player start with 30 points, but a GM may allow this amount to be lower or higher at start for their group.

Skills

The skills available to the character are the ones mentioned earlier in the part The Basics, but here is a reminder:

Athletics: Ruling over most physical exertions, be it running, jumping, climbing and swimming.
Fighting: Covering the characters general aptitude in combat, be it in close-quarters or at a distance, attacking and defending, tripping and grappling, and when you act.
Subterfuge: The skill that covers things like stealth, be it moving silently or unseen and hiding. It can also cover lying, picking locks, forgery and pickpocketing.
Tinker: Rules over craftsmanship, being generally handy in most kinds of trades like technology, vehicles, electricity and computers, but also first aid, fixing or sabotaging things.

Knowledge: The skill that covers general knowledge on various fields in the world, and how up to speed on the world around the character you are as well as memory.

Vigilance: The skill for being on your guard. It covers areas like awareness, seeing through a lie, noticing tiny details, hidden things or general foresight.

A character can raise the skill-value one step at a time by spending points. To raise a skill from 0 to 1 costs 3 points. To raise a skill further costs the previous cost plus 1 or 2 depending on if the value the skill is raised to is even or odd. You can only raise a skill to +5.

Skill-value:

Cost(Total cost)

1

3 points(3)

2

4 points(7 points in total)

3

6 points(13 points in total)

4

7 points(20 points in total)

5

9 points(29 points in total)

It is also possible for a character to start with a lower skill-value than 0. This will earn the player points to spend somewhere else, rather than costing points. To start with a -1 nets the player 2 bonus point to spend. Each step further nets an extra 2 bonus points. You can only lower a skill to -3.

Specializations

Specializations are focused expertise in a certain field of the aforementioned skills that shows a spearheaded competence.
Examples of specializations are:
Running, Swimming, Climbing, Leaping, Balance and Tumbling (Athletics).
Melee-attack, Ranged attack, Defense, Grabbing, Tripping and Initiative (Fighting).
Moving silently, Moving unseen, Bluffing, Sleight of hand, Lockpicking and Hiding (Subterfuge).
Machines, Vehicles, Computers, First aid, Sewing and Carpentry (Tinker).
History, Law, Local, Crime, Chemistry and Medicine (Knowledge).

Searching, Awareness, Body-language, Reading faces (Vigilance).

To obtain a specialization costs 1 point, and said specialization gives a +1 bonus during fitting checks to ruling skill. To raise a specializations bonus further costs according to this table:

Specialization-bonus:

Cost(Total cost):

+1

1 point(1 point in total)

+2

2 points(3 points in total)

+3

3 points(6 points in total)

+4

4 points(10 points in total)

+5

5 points(15 points in total)

A specialization by any other name

Don’t be afraid to rename a specialization in order to give it more flavor to your character. Call melee-attack face-punching or ass-kicking, it will still count when doing a melee-attack and not just punching someone's face or kicking their ass. As long as you get this over with your GM on what the specialization is defined as and will cover there should be no problem.

Abilities

Abilities affect the game in other ways than skills and specializations do. Some abilities can affect an outcome by circumstantial bonuses or give new mechanics outside these basic core rules.

Abilities are listed in their own chapter with their costs, requirements and effects.

Gear

Gear covers utility tools, weapons, and armor. Gear has their cost in Gear-points(GP) that must be paid in order to be acquired.

You can spend points to turn them into Gear-points which you use to buy equipment and tools. 1 point= 3 Gear-points.

Various gear is listed in their own chapter with cost and effect.

Abilities

Adept 1:

Cost: 2 Points

– The character has become so good at a certain endeavor, he/she can turn the tides of luck to success. When you pick this ability, choose a specialization the character has acquired, once a session when you make a roll using this specialization you can turn a die into a 4. You may take this ability more than once, each time for a different specialization. 

Adept 2: Requires Adept 1 and Specialization of choice +2

Cost: 3 Points

– The character has become so good at an endeavor, success is more often than not certain. Choose an specialization the character is already adept in. The character can now turn a die for that roll into a 4 twice per session. You may not use Adept more than once per roll.

Adept 3: Requires Adept 2 and Specialization of choice +3

Cost: 3 Points

– The character has become so good at an endeavor that the character is very likely to exceed expectations. Choose an specialization the character is already adept in. The character can now turn a die for that roll into a 4 three times per session. You may not use Adept more than once per roll.

Adrenaline 1:

Cost: 3 Points

– The character is able to ignore being stunned but suffer a -3 penalty to that action in additions to any other penalties active. This penalty does not count as a penalty from injury.

Adrenaline 2: Requires Adrenaline 1

Cost: 3 Points

– The character is able to ignore being stunned but suffer a -2 penalty to that action in additions to any other penalties active. This penalty does not count as a penalty from injury.

Adrenaline 3: Requires Adrenaline 2

Cost: 5 Points

– The character is able to ignore being stunned but suffer a -1 penalty to that action in additions to any other penalties active. This penalty does not count as a penalty from injury.

Attribute 1: 

Cost: 6 points
– When you pick this ability, choose one of the following: Strong/ Enduring/ Dexterous/ Agile/ Intelligent/ Perceptive. Whenever you make a skill-check where attribute of choice may be helpful, you may add another d6 to the roll and keep the highest 2. You may acquire this ability more than once, each time choosing a different attribute.


Attribute 2: Requires Attribute 1:

Cost: 7 points
– Same as Attribute 1, except you roll 4d6 and keep the 2 highest when making a             skill-check where chosen attribute is applicable.

Attribute 3: Requires Attribute 2

Cost: 8 points
– Same as Attribute 2, except you roll 5d6 and keep the 2 highest when making a             skill-check where chosen attribute is applicable.

Attributes and examples of what they can aid you with:


Being strong can help where your physical strength is of aid, such as climbing and lifting things.


A person with great endurance will often excel in areas where stamina is of good use, such as running longer distances.


Dextrous is the ability that represents good hand-to-eye coordination, and can help when you need to be quick with your fingers or when to throw something.


A person that is agile has great mobility which is useful when tumbling or trying to move with care.


While there are many forms of intelligence, being attributed as intelligent often means that the person has a great ability to recall information and knowledge as well as applying it in practice. Logical and critical thinking is also a part of being intelligent.

Being perceptive means having a greater ability to notice things, be it through the normal five senses or a form of intuition.

Bold fighter:

Cost: 3 points

– During combat, if a character with this ability has a higher initiative than an opponent, that character has a +2 bonus against that opponent on both attacking, tripping, grabbing and defense.

Break the fall: Requires Specialization: Tumbling +1
Cost: 2 Points

– When the character is risking fall-damage the distance of the fall is considered halved.

Combat surge: Requires Fighting +3

Cost: 5 Points

– The characters is able to act more than most in battle. When rolling for initiative in combat the character rolls 1d6 separately from the normal initiative-roll and adds his/her initiative-specialization to that roll as well. The result is also considered for the Combat-order and lets the character take a second turn in a round. During this extra turn the character can only take one action.

Convincing:

Cost: 1 Point

– The character has the presence and influence that can make most people base their decisions on their words and will. Convincing can only affect NPCs at the behest of the GM. This is mostly a narrative function.

Coordinator: Requires Specialization: Awareness +1

Cost: 4 Points

– The character can spend an action during combat to give any team-members within sight and earshot his/her teamwork-bonus to a specific roll ordained by the character.

Counter-attack:

Cost: 3 Points
– Whenever a character with this ability makes a successful dodge or block from an attack, the character gets a +2 bonus to attacking whoever attacked the character on his/her next turn.

Dead aim:

Cost: 2 Points
– Your ranged attacks land where it hurts, +2 to damage on ranged attacks.

Fight the pain:

Cost: 5 Points

– For one action the character can ignore any penalties from injuries but is stunned the next turn. A stun that is gained from using “Fight the pain” can not be ignored by “Adrenaline”.

Frenzy:

Cost: 6 Points
– The character is dangerous when hard-pressed. When staggered the character has +2 to close ranged attacks as well as +1 damage on close attacks. The penalty from being staggered is still applied to the attack-roll.

Heavy hitter:

Cost: 2 Points
– The character knows how to put weight behind their blows, +2 to damage on close ranged attacks.

Instinctive surge:
Cost: 5 Points
– A sudden rush of action comes to the character when put in danger. When becoming staggered the first time during an encounter the character can immediately make an action without the penalty of being staggered.

Intimidating:

Cost: 1 Point
– The character has the presence and influence that can make most people quake with fear or at least take their threats seriously. Intimidating can only affect NPCs at the behest of the GM. This is mostly a narrative function, but the GM can give certain penalties to a scared NPC.

Out of nowhere!: Requires Subterfuge +2
Cost: 4 Points
Whenever the character does an attack on an unsuspecting opponent, often by sneaking up on him/her, the character can turn one of the dice on the attack roll as a 6.

Profession:

Cost: 1 Point
– Narrative function that can affect what the character has access to resources depending on its profession, be it locales, living standard or influence.

Punisher: Requires Fighting +1
Cost: 3 Points
– The character brings the pain, whenever the character hits another and does damage that gives the opponent a penalty, raise that penalty by 1. Example 1: The character with punisher makes the opponent bruised and suffers a temporary -2 penalty due to this. Example 2: The character hits an opponent and staggers an already staggered opponent, not only does the opponent suffers a stun, but the opponents staggered now gives the opponent a -3 penalty instead of the normal -2.

Runner:

Cost: 2 Points

–  The character is faster than most and can move 2 movement-ranges in an action by taking a -2 penalty for any actions until the beginning of your next turn. If you are chasing someone down or running away from someone you have a +1 bonus to your roll.

Self-defense: Requires Specialization: Grabbing or Tripping +1

Cost: 2 Points
– Whenever the character makes a successful block from a melee attack, the character gets a +2 bonus to tripping or grabbing whoever attacked the character on his/her next turn.

Submission specialist: Requires Specialization: Grappling +2
Cost: 4 Points
Whenever the character attempts to damage using grappling damage, roll 2d6 and use the highest die for the damage-result.

Supporter:

Cost: 3 Points

– The character is adept at helping others. When using teamwork, the character gives a +4 bonus instead of the normal +2.

Survival instinct:

Cost: 5 Points

– The character has a way to fight even when it’s looking grim. When staggered the character has a +2 bonus to any defenses as well as running. The penalty from being staggered is still applicable.

Toughness 1:
Cost: 3 Points

– The character is more durable than most and has a +1 bonus to protection.

Toughness 2: Requires Toughness 2

Cost: 5 Points

– The character can take even more of a beating and has a +2 bonus to protection. This bonus replaces the bonus from Toughness 1.

Toughness 3: Requires Toughness 3

Cost: 7 Points

– The character is hard to knock down and has a +3 bonus to protection. This bonus replaces the bonus from Toughness 1 and Toughness 2.

Gear

Gear covers utility tools, weapons, and armor. Gear has their cost in Gear-points(GP) that must be paid in order to be acquired.

Tools of the trade

Cell-phone: 1 GP

Whether the vigilantes private one or a burner phone to throw away, a cellphone is a must-have in the modern society.

Laptop: 1 GP

An essential tool for some people. Allows for work regarding technology requiring stronger hardware than a cell-phone.

Utility items: 1 GP
Choose 5 of the following, you may choose an item more than once to have more of it:
– Rope

– Flashlight

– Duct tape

– Backpack

– Sports bag (counts as 2 items)

– Laser-pointer

– Handcuffs

– Lighter

– Miscellaneous item: wire cutter, bag of nails, mirror or something else..

Lockpick: 1 GP
To break into non-mechanical/electronical locks.

Skill-related gear: 1-2 GP

Whatever can be used to help or enable a certain skill to be used, be it climbing-gear, the wires and software necessary for hacking or something else.

Binocular: 1 GP

Used to see things from afar.

First aid-kit: 1 GP

Bandages, plasters, splints, bloodstoppers, useful things to have when injured.

Outfit

Standard garments 

1 GP

Extra clothes to help hide your identity. Separate outfit from what you normally wear during the day.

Choose 4 of the following:
– Hooded sweatshirt

– Gloves

– Cap/hat/Skiing mask

– Sunglasses

– Running-shoes

– Scarf

– Wind jacket/coat

Light protective gear 

2 GP

Protects slightly against attacks, raises the wearers protection by 1.

Choose 3 of the following:

– Leather jacket, or anything of more enduring quality.

– Elbow-pads

– Knee-pads

– Ski-goggles

– Boots

– Gloves, workers or leather.

Medium protective gear 

3 GP

Protects slightly more against attacks, raises the wearers protection by 2. This effect cannot be combined with any other protective gears.

Choose 2 of the following:

– Shoulder-pads

– Elbow guards

– Knee guards

– Steel-tipped boots

– Helmet, skiing/skating/cycling

– Goggles

Weaponry

The improvised 

1 GP
These weapons may be found and used on the spot, but also brought along as normal weapons for the vigilante. (Pay only this cost if you plan to use these weapons on a more permanent basis, not on one separate occasion.)

Hammers, screwdrivers, wrenches and their like can be wielded with one hand as well as thrown at enemies that are near or closer. These weapons add a +1 bonus to damage.

Sledgehammers, pickaxes, shovels, firemans axes and their like can be wielded with two hands or one hand. When wielded with two hands these weapons add a +2 bonus to damage, but on a miss gives the wielder a -1 penalty to all defenses until next turn. When wielded in one hand these weapons only give a +1 bonus to damage, but a -2 penalty to attack with it.

Chains and other things with reach and flexibility adds a +1 bonus to damage. They also add a +1 bonus to tripping and grabbing attempts.

Smaller stones or something with a bit of weight like an empty bottle can be thrown at enemies that are far or closer. Adds a +1 bonus to damage.

Bricks or something with a bit more weight can be thrown at enemies near or closer. Adds a +2 bonus to damage.

Trashcan lids and other items that occupy a large space and is durable can be used as a form of shield and gives a +1 bonus to defense. Requires the use of one hand.

The professional

3 GP

These weapons are made for combat and acquired for that reason.

Combat-knives, batons, tonfas, escrima sticks can be wielded in close range and add a +2 bonus to damage. It’s also possible to throw them at enemies near or closer and adds a +1 bonus to damage on a hit when thrown.

Slingshots can use pebbles or marbles to hit targets from far or closer. Adds a +2 bonus to damage. Can at times be used from very far.

Throwing knives/stars can be thrown at enemies far and closer and adds a +2 to damage. They can also be wielded in close quarters and adds a +1 bonus to damage when used in melee. Usually comes in sets of 5.

Stun-prods and stun-guns can be wielded in close range and upon a hit deal minor shock damage. A taser can shoot skin-adhering projectiles once per encounter on an opponent at near or close range, dealing minor shock damage.

The Custom

1-6 GP

Sometimes you need to do it yourself. Talk to your GM what you want to have, who will see if it is possible, fitting, if the character is able to construct such an item and if so, what the fitting cost is.

Vehicles

Vehicles are a good and fast, if not necessary way of transportation. They do however come with caveats such as being traceable through being registered and licensed. They are also conspicuous if used near areas of conflict.

Public transportation card: 0 GP
Lets you use the public transportation system of the city you’re in.

Bicycle: 3 GP
A non-motorized vehicle that let’s you go faster than when on foot. Gives a +4 bonus to catching up or running away, but can be a hindrance when facing obstacles. Can be used for two.

Motorcycle: 6 GP
A fast and agile motor-vehicle that can fit two people. Is able to ignore some traffic by going in between lanes and cars. Can be loud.

Car: 7 GP
A medium sized motor-vehicle that can fit 4-6 people. Has some room for gear in the trunk.

Minivan: 8 GP

A larger vehicle that can fit 6-10 people. Has lots of room for storing gear. Highly noticable.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *