Noontide Character Creation test

Character Creation  

To play Noontide, everyone except the GM needs to create a Player Character (PC).  Exactly what kind of adventurer your PC might be is up to you, but the choices you make in  this chapter will establish three important sets of abilities for them: how they fight; the type  of adventuring expertise they have; and how they can influence and persuade Non-Player  Characters (NPCs) controlled by the GM. Your PC might be a strong and stalwart warrior,  adept at tracking monsters and slaying them with blade and bow; a wise and cunning master  of magic, learned in legends and lore; a swift and stealthy explorer, wielding daggers and  lockpicks with dexterity and determination; or a faithful servant of the gods, blessed with  divine magic and guidance. This chapter lays out your options in general terms – the Combat  Mode, Quest Mode, Free Mode, and Challenges chapters explain what your choices will  mean in detail.  

Always round down any decimal places when calculating your PC’s statistics. Section 1: Attribute Scores  

Note: It’s recommended to read sections 1-5 before creating your first PC, as the  decisions you make in section 1 will determine your options in each subsequent section.  

Each PC is defined primarily by their Attribute Scores – six numbers that represent  their physical and mental capabilities. These numbers underpin a PC’s prowess in combat,  their ability to explore the world and overcome its hazards, and the ways in which they can  influence and persuade non-player characters (NPCs) controlled by the GM. The first step in  creating a PC is to spend points to increase some or all of their Attribute Scores. A new PC  has Attribute Scores between 5, which represents the average for a healthy adult, and 12,  which represents distinctly above-average ability. As a PC completes Quests, they gain  additional points to further increase their Attribute Scores, potentially up to the maximum  of 25 – which represents near-superhuman ability.  

A brand new PC starts with Attribute Scores of 5, and is awarded 20 Attribute Points (AP) which must be spent to increase some or all of their Attribute Scores above 5 before  starting play. Each AP increases a single Attribute Score by 1. All 20 AP must be spent, and no  Attribute Score can exceed 12 at this stage. Once you have finished allocating your AP, record  your PC’s Attribute Scores in the Attribute Scores grid on your character sheet. To check that  you have allocated the correct number of AP, calculate the total of all of your PC’s Attribute  Scores – it should be 50.  

Minimum Attribute Scores 

A PC’s Attribute Scores must meet or exceed certain values to use certain types of  equipment and magic, as stated in Sections 2 and 3 of this chapter. As you go through the  character creation process, make sure that your PC’s Attribute Scores meet the requirements  for the training and equipment you want them to have. You can redistribute their starting AP  at any time if necessary.  

The next part of this section summarizes each Attribute Score in turn, describing  what it represents and how a PC’s capabilities are improved by increasing it. 

Physical Attribute Scores  

Strength  

The Strength Score represents a PC’s muscle power. In combat, it contributes to a  PC’s ability to use weapons, especially heavy close-combat weapons. The Strength Score also  determines whether PCs are capable of performing feats of athletics, such as leaping great  distances or moving heavy obstacles. In social situations, PCs with high Strength Scores can  use their imposing physical stature to inspire, reassure, or threaten other characters.  

Invest in Strength if you want to strike hard, forge a path ahead using sheer might, and  impress or intimidate others with your powerful physique. 

Agility  

The Agility Score represents the speed and precision of a PC’s movements. In  combat, it contributes to a PC’s skill with weapons, especially bows and light close-combat  weapons, and their ability to avoid damage if they do not wear heavy armour. The Agility  Score also determines whether PCs are capable of performing feats of acrobatics and  stealth, such as keeping their balance on a narrow beam, or sneaking past a sentry without 

being detected. In social situations, PCs with high Agility Scores can use subtle body  language to beguile or distract others.  

Invest in Agility if you want to unleash a barrage of swift attacks, move quickly and quietly,  and be a master of manipulation and misdirection. 

Endurance  

The Endurance Score represents a PC’s ability to persevere through physical  hardship. First and foremost, it determines how much damage a PC can take before being  killed. It also determines the effectiveness of heavy armour for PCs who choose to wear it.  The Endurance Score also grants additional Surge Points, which can be spent to exceed the  normal limits of a PC’s physical Attributes at critical moments. In social situations, PCs with  high Endurance Scores carry an air of calm, collected confidence.  

All PCs benefit from investing in Endurance. Invest strongly if you want to use heavy  armour and shields to bear the brunt of enemy assaults, be a persistent and tenacious threat  on the battlefield, and wear your scars with pride to inspire or warn others. 

Mental Attribute Scores  

Intelligence  

A PC’s Intelligence Score represents their powers of logic and reasoning, as well as  their ability to piece together clues and draw conclusions from evidence. A high Intelligence  Score is necessary for a PC to use Arcane Magic – an esoteric and complex art through which  a PC can rain bolts of destructive force upon their foes, or bend the fabric of reality around  themselves and other characters to reposition them on the battlefield. Increasing a PC’s  Intelligence Score increases the potency of any Arcane Magic spells they cast, and how  quickly they can solve puzzles and draw conclusions from evidence. PCs with high  Intelligence Scores are perceptive and articulate, making them adept at using diplomacy and  deception to persuade others.  

Invest in Intelligence if you want to wield Arcane Magic to control the battlefield or  destroy your foes, see through riddles and mysteries, and speak your mind with eloquence  and erudition.

Faith  

The Faith Score represents the strength of a PC’s belief in the creator gods who  bound and shaped primordial matter to form the world in its first Age. PCs whose belief is  strong enough can awaken and command the dormant magic of creation using a power  known as Invocation. Invocation can be used in combat to protect the PC and their allies, or  to weaken the defences of their enemies. Outside of combat, PCs with high Faith Scores can  beseech the gods to show them the quickest path to their goal, and to reveal secrets and  hidden dangers that lie ahead. A PC with a high Faith Score becomes a walking conduit for  divine energy, which manifests around them as an otherworldly aura of light and shadow  that intensifies as the PC’s Faith Score increases. In social situations, this aura can be used to  captivate and inspire others, or to mask the PC’s true motives.  

Invest in Faith if you wish to bolster your allies, weaken your enemies, and manipulate the  physical world with the divine power of Invocation, and exert a supernatural emotive force.  

Willpower  

 The Willpower Score represents the strength of a PC’s determination, courage, and  self-belief. A high Willpower Score is necessary to learn Essence Magic – a spectacular and  devastating power which conjures elemental fire and ice to wreak havoc on the battlefield. A  PC can channel their own life force into these spells, harming themselves in exchange for  increasing the power of their magic. Increasing a PC’s Willpower Score strengthens their  resolve in the face of danger, allowing them to stand firm when confronted with monsters  and other phenomena that might cause others to flee in terror. It also grants additional  Focus Points, which are used to increase a PC’s concentration or exceed the normal limits of  their mental Attributes at critical moments. In social situations, PCs with high Willpower  Scores can win over others through sheer force of conviction.  

Invest in Willpower if you want to blast your foes with the elemental fury of Essence  Magic, be a fearless leader, and rally or break other characters with your unshakeable  resolve. 

Attribute Factors  

Each Attribute Score has a corresponding Attribute Factor. These are used at certain  points in the character creation process, and are frequently used while playing the game to  resolve the PCs’ actions. Many actions that a PC can take represent the application of a  particular Attribute, and in these cases, a number of dice equal to the corresponding  Attribute Factor are rolled to determine how successful the action is. Increasing an Attribute  Factor by 1 increases the number of dice you can roll when taking an action that depends on  that Attribute Factor by 1, making the action more likely to succeed, and increasing your PC’s  contribution if it is a group action.  

Each Attribute Factor is equal to the corresponding Attribute Score divided by 3.  Alternatively, you can refer to the table below.  

Attribute Score Attribute Factor  

5 1  

6-8 2  

9-11 3  

12 

Once you have finished allocating your PC’s starting AP, determine each of their  Attribute Factors and record them in the Attribute Factors (AF) column on your character  sheet. Don’t forget to check your PC’s Attribute Factors if you redistribute their starting AP.  

Note: Always take care not to mix up Attribute Scores and Attribute Factors when the  rules refer to either of them.  

Sidebar: Attribute Score Tips 

5s – Don’t be afraid to leave up to three Attribute Scores at 5. Doing so allows you to  maximize other scores and create a more specialized PC.  

7s and 11s – Most Attribute Score increments provide a PC with a direct benefit: either a  higher Attribute Factor, or meeting the required minimum for a certain type of training or  equipment. However, while increasing the Endurance Score always provides an additional Hit  Point, increasing any other Attribute Score from 6 to 7, or from 10 to 11, does not provide 

any immediate benefits. Avoid leaving any Attribute Scores at 7 or 11 unless you are certain  that you don’t want the benefits that would be gained from increasing any other scores  instead.  

Vital Statistics  

Having determined your PC’s Attribute Scores and Attribute Factors, there are some  important numbers that depend on them that must be recorded in the Vital Statistics grid on  your character sheet.  

Hit Point Maximum  

A PC’s Hit Point maximum determines how much damage they can take. Enemy  attacks and magic spells, as well as traps and other hazards, can cause a PC to lose Hit  Points, and if their Hit Point total is reduced to zero, the PC is killed.  

Each PC’s Hit Point maximum is equal to 6 + their Endurance Score. Record this  number in the Hit Points field on your character sheet.  

Injuries  

Whenever a PC loses a total of 5 Hit Points, they suffer an Injury. Each Injury must be  marked in the Injuries field on the character sheet. Whenever dice are rolled for a PC, the  maximum number of dice that can be rolled is reduced by the number of Injuries the PC  has. Injuries can be healed using the Treat Wounds action in Quest Mode, and are  automatically healed when the Party returns to a safe area after completing a Quest. A PC  begins the game with zero Injuries.  

Surge Points & Focus Points  

Surge Points and Focus Points allow a PC to exceed the normal limits of their physical  or mental capabilities at critical moments. A PC begins the game with a number of Surge  Points equal to their Endurance Factor, and a number of Focus Points equal to their  Willpower Factor. Simply copy these two Attribute Factors into the boxes marked “Surge  Points” and “Focus Points” respectively. The Quest Mode chapter explains how Surge Points  and Focus Points are used during the game. 

Note: The final score in the Vital Statistics grid, Encumbrance, is explained and  determined in Section 3.  

 

Section 2: Training 

Each PC has undergone extensive training to become a formidable opponent on the  battlefield. Exactly what combination of weapons, magic, and armour a PC has learned to  use effectively is represented by Training Levels. A brand new PC has 5 Training Points which  must be spent on Training Levels before starting play. The types of training available are  divided into three categories: Defence Training, Weapons Training, and Magic Training.  Within each of these categories are several Training Disciplines for specific combat  techniques and magic spells. Each Training Discipline has four Training Levels that PCs can  reach, with each successive Training Level within each discipline representing greater  mastery. Reaching higher Training Levels in a particular Training Discipline increases the  number of dice you can roll for your PC when they attack, defend, or cast a spell in Combat  Mode. The more dice you roll when your PC takes a particular action, the more effective that  action is likely to be. Certain Training Levels also grant PCs additional abilities which are  explained in the Combat Mode chapter.  

A new PC can reach a maximum of Training Level 2 in any Training Discipline, and  each Training Level within each discipline has certain minimum Attribute Score  requirements. Each Training Level in any discipline costs 1 Training Point, and a PC must  spend a Training Point to reach Training Level 1 in a particular discipline in order to spend a  second Training Point to reach Training Level 2 in that discipline. After they complete Quests  and become more powerful, PCs who have reached Training Level 2 in a Training Discipline  can reach Training Level 3, and then Training Level 4.  

The rest of this section describes each Training Discipline, including the benefits of  reaching Training Levels 1 and 2 in each. Once you have chosen how to assign your PC’s  Training Points, record their Training Levels in the Training grid on your character sheet.  

Sidebar: Training Levels and Attribute Scores: Choosing Training Levels that  complement your PC’s Attribute Scores will ensure that your PC is fully effective in combat. If  you increased a particular Attribute Score by 3 or more, and find that you don’t want your PC  to use equipment or spells that depend on that score, you might want to rethink your PC’s  fighting style or redistribute some of their AP. 

Defence Training Disciplines  

Defence Training is essential to surviving each battle. It is divided into three Training  Disciplines: Evasion, Heavy Armour, and Shields. When a PC is attacked, or targeted by an  enemy spell, the player rolls dice to avoid the attack or spell (see Defence Dice in Section 3).  The number of dice rolled is equal to either the PC’s Training Level in Evasion plus their  Agility Factor if they are wearing light armour or no armour at all, or their Training Level in  Heavy Armour plus their Endurance Factor if they are wearing heavy armour. If the PC has a  shield, their Training Level in Shields can be added to the number of dice rolled, providing  additional protection.  

Note: Since a PC benefits from the Heavy Armour discipline only when they are  wearing heavy armour, and from the Evasion discipline only when they are not wearing  heavy armour, they can never benefit from both disciplines at the same time. It’s therefore  strongly recommended to take Training Levels in either Heavy Armour or Evasion, not both.  Taking Training Levels in both disciplines does not provide practical flexibility, as PCs do not  usually get a chance to change or remove their armour during a Quest. 

Evasion  

The Evasion discipline focuses on staying mobile in combat, anticipating and dodging  enemy attacks and spells. For each Training Level a PC has in this discipline, one die can be  rerolled when the PC defends against a spell. The benefits of this discipline can be reduced if  a PC is carrying heavy equipment, as explained under Encumbrance in Section 3. 

Attribute Score Requirements: A PC must have an Agility Score of at least 6 to reach  Training Level 1 in Evasion, and at least 10 to reach Training Level 2.  

Heavy Armour  

The Heavy Armour discipline teaches warriors how to take advantage of the superior  protection and momentum provided by layers of plate and chain mail. With no Training  Levels in this discipline, a PC cannot wear heavy armour. For each Training Level a PC has in  this discipline, one die can be rerolled when the PC defends against a melee attack. In  addition, wearing heavy armour allows a PC to push enemies around the battlefield more  easily, and resist more firmly when enemies attempt to do the same to them. 

Attribute Score Requirements: A PC must have an Endurance Score of at least 6 to  reach Training Level 1 in Heavy Armour, and at least 10 to reach Training Level 2. 

Shields  

The Shields discipline allows a PC to use a shield to block enemy attacks and spells,  gaining additional protection. With no Training Levels in this discipline, a character cannot  use a shield. For each Training Level a PC has in this discipline, one die can be rerolled when  the PC defends against a ranged attack. At Training Level 2, a PC can bash an enemy with  their shield, knocking them off balance and leaving them more susceptible to attacks.  

Attribute Score Requirements: Any PC can reach Training Level 1 in Shields, but a PC  must have Strength and Endurance Scores of at least 8 to reach Training Level 2.  

Attacking and Casting Spells: Action Dice  

Each PC has a number of Action Dice, which are rolled when attacking or casting  spells in Combat Mode. The number of Action Dice a PC has depends on their Character  Level: a brand new PC has 6 Action Dice, and gains 1 additional Action Die at every even numbered Character Level. The Weapon and Magic Training Levels you’ll choose in the rest  

of this Section, as well as the Attribute Factors you chose in Section 1, determine the  maximum number of Action Dice you can roll when your PC attacks with a particular type of  weapon or casts a particular spell. The more dice you roll, the more effective the attack or  spell is likely to be.  

Weapon Training Disciplines  

A brief introduction to the types of weapons available to PCs, and the corresponding  Weapon Training Disciplines, is given below.  

Melee Weapons  

Melee weapons are divided into two categories: Simple and Martial. Simple melee  weapons include clubs, cudgels, and staves, as well as tools and other objects not designed  to be used as weapons. A PC does not require Training Levels to use Simple weapons.  Martial weapons are more deadly than Simple weapons, and can be used to make special  attacks, but wielding them effectively requires training. Martial melee weapons are divided 

into five weapon types: Axes, Hammers, Light Blades, Spears, and Swords, and each  weapon type has a dedicated Training Discipline with four Training Levels. A PC must reach  Training Level 1 in the corresponding discipline to use weapons of a particular type  effectively, and reaching Training Level 2 allows them to make special attacks.  

Attribute Score Requirements: A PC must have Strength and Agility Scores of at  least 6 to reach Training Level 1 in the Axes, Hammers, Light Blades, Spears, or Swords Training Disciplines. Strength and Agility Scores of at least 10 are required to reach Training  Level 2 in Axes, Hammers, Spears, or Swords. To reach Training Level 2 in Light Blades, a PC  must have a Strength Score of at least 8 and an Agility Score of at least 10.  

Choose Your Weapon  

When a PC attacks an enemy, the maximum number of Action Dice that can be rolled  for the attack is equal to the PC’s Training Level in the corresponding weapon type plus  either their Strength Factor or their Agility Factor, depending on the type of weapon used.  A brief description of each melee weapon type, is given below to help you compare your  options, including which Attribute Factor is used to calculate the maximum number of  Action Dice that can be rolled when attacking with a weapon of that type, and the special  attacks granted by reaching Training Level 2 in the corresponding training discipline.  

Axes and Hammers are favoured by warriors who value power over finesse. A PC’s  Strength Factor is used to determine the maximum number of Action Dice that can be rolled  when attacking with an Axe or a Hammer, and each hit deals 2 points of damage. PCs who  reach Training Level 2 in the Axes Training Discipline can make Sweeping Attacks that hit  multiple enemies, while PCs who reach Training Level 2 in the Hammers discipline can make  Staggering Blows that deal extra damage but leave the PC more open to attack.  

Light Blades are swift and agile. A PC’s Agility Factor is used to determine the  maximum number of Action Dice that can be rolled when attacking with a Light Blade, and  each hit has a chance to find an enemy’s weak spot, such as a gap in their armour or a  vulnerable organ, becoming a Critical Hit. Normal hits deal 1 point of damage, while Critical  Hits deal 3 points of damage. PCs who reach Training Level 2 in this discipline can make a  Feint Attack to misdirect an enemy’s defence. If a Feint Attacks is successful, all of its hits are  Critical Hits, but if it fails, it deals no damage at all. 

Spears and Swords strike a balance between precision and power. A PC’s Strength  Factor is used to determine the maximum number of Action Dice that can be rolled when  attacking with a Spear or a Sword, and a number equal to the PC’s Agility Factor can be  rerolled for each attack. Each hit deals 1 point of damage. PCs who reach Training Level 2 in  the Spears Training Discipline can make Cautious Strikes that keep their targets at a  distance, sacrificing attack power for increased defence. PCs who reach Training Level 2 in  the Swords Training Discipline can Counterattack when an enemy fails to hit them.  

Melee Weapons Sidebar: It’s strongly recommended for a new PC to take Training  Levels in only one melee weapon type discipline. At higher Character Levels, PCs unlock the  ability to apply their highest Training Level in a melee weapon type discipline to additional  melee weapon type disciplines, allowing PCs to master multiple close combat fighting styles  without compromising their defensive or magical abilities. 

Melee Weapon Size  

Each melee weapons is either one-handed or two-handed. Two-handed weapons  deal more damage than one-handed weapons, but using a one-handed weapon leaves the  other hand free for either a second one-handed weapon or a shield. Axes, Hammers, Spears,  Swords, and Simple melee weapons can all be one-handed or two-handed, but Light Blades  are always one-handed. The Combat Mode chapter explains the differences between one and two-handed weapons in detail.  

Dual Wielding  

The Dual Wielding Training Discipline allows a PC to attack with two one-handed  Martial melee weapons of the same type simultaneously. The rules for doing so are  explained in detail in the Combat Mode chapter. A PC who has no Training Levels in Dual  Wielding cannot attack with two weapons simultaneously. Each Training Level in this  discipline allows a PC to roll a number of extra Action Dice when attacking with two  weapons, depending on what type of weapon they use. This is explained in Section 3. A PC  cannot use two Simple weapons at the same time.  

Attribute Score Requirements: A PC must have Strength and Agility Scores of at  least 8 to reach Training Level 1 in Dual Wielding, and at least 12 to reach Training Level 2. 

Ranged Weapons  

Like melee weapons, ranged weapons are divided into Simple and Martial categories.  The crossbow is the only Simple ranged weapon, while Martial ranged weapons comprise  the longbow and the shortbow. The Archery Training Discipline governs the use of all of  these weapons. A PC with no Training Levels in this discipline can use a crossbow, but cannot  use longbows or shortbows. Reaching Training Level 1 in Archery allows a PC to use  longbows and shortbows, while Training Level 2 allows them to make a Multi-Shot that fires  arrows at multiple targets, or a Focused Shot that has increased range depending on the  PC’s Training Level in the Archery discipline. A Multi-Shot made with a shortbow can target  more enemies, while a Focused Shot made with a longbow deals increased damage. A  crossbow cannot be used to make a Multi-Shot, but can be used to make a Focused Shot.  

Attribute Score Requirements: A PC must have a Strength Score of at least 6 and an  Agility Score of at least 8 to reach Training Level 1 in Archery, and a Strength Score of at  least 8 and an Agility Score of at least 12 to reach Training Level 2.  

Magic Training Disciplines  

There are three types of magic that PCs can learn: Arcane Magic, Invocation, and  Essence Magic. Each type of magic has two Training Disciplines, each of which governs a  different spell. The Combat Mode chapter explains how each spell works in detail.  

In order to cast a particular spell, a PC needs to reach at least Training Level 1 in the  corresponding Training Discipline. Reaching Training Level 1 requires a score of at least 8 in a  particular Attribute – Intelligence for Arcane Magic disciplines, Faith for Invocation  disciplines, or Willpower for Essence Magic disciplines. A score of at least 12 in the same  Attribute is required to reach Training Level 2.  

Increasing a PC’s Intelligence, Faith, or Willpower Factor by 1 increases the number  of dice rolled when casting spells that use that Factor by 1. Each successive Training Level in  a particular Magic Training Discipline also increases the number of dice rolled by 1, and adds  additional effects to the spell, such as increasing its maximum number of targets.  

Arcane Magic

Arcane Magic is used to assail foes with beams of energy or to fold the fabric of  reality, with Force Arc and Warp spells respectively. Each of these spells has its own Training  Discipline. Force Arc spells fire rays of piercing light at one or more enemies, while Warp  spells teleport their targets to different locations on the battlefield. Doing so allows the  caster to control the flow of battle in numerous ways, such as separating enemies from each  other, plucking allies out of dire situations, or forcing enemies into (or out of) close combat.  To cast Arcane Magic spells, a PC must be holding a special piece of equipment, called an  Arcane Catalyst, which takes the form of either a wand or a staff. A Staff Catalyst can be  used as a weapon when held in both hands, but a Wand Catalyst cannot be used as a  weapon at all.  

Attribute Score Requirements: A PC must have an Intelligence Score of at least 8 to  reach Training Level 1 in the Force Arc and Warp Training Disciplines, and at least 12 to  reach Training Level 2. Training Level 2 in either discipline increases the maximum number  of targets for the corresponding spell by 1.  

Invocation  

Invocation is used to manipulate the magic of the gods that permeates the physical  world. This magic can strengthen or undermine the very bonds of matter, depending on how  it is called forth. The power of Affinity binds matter together, while its counterpart, Entropy,  disrupts and dissociates matter. Each of these powers has its own Training Discipline. Affinity  increases the number of dice rolled when an affected PC defends themselves against enemy  attacks, while Entropy decreases the number of dice rolled when an affected enemy defends  themselves against attacks made by PCs. A PC need only be able to speak to use Invocation –  no special equipment is required.  

Attribute Score Requirements: A PC must have a Faith Score of at least 8 to reach  Training Level 1 in the Affinity and Entropy Training Disciplines, and at least 12 to reach  Training Level 2. Reaching Training Level 2 in either discipline increases the maximum  number of targets for the corresponding spell by 1. 

Essence Magic 

Essence Magic consists of the twin arts of Pyromancy and Cryomancy, each of which  has its own Training Discipline. A Pyromancy spell creates sheets of roaring flames that deal  damage to multiple enemies, while a Cryomancy spell blasts a single target with  supernatural frost that deals damage and reduces the target’s attack power. A PC must have  an empty hand to use Essence Magic, but no special equipment is required.  

Attribute Score Requirements: A PC must have a Willpower Score of at least 8 to  reach Training Level 1 in the Pyromancy or Cryomancy Training Disciplines, and at least 12 to reach Training Level 2. Reaching Training Level 2 in Pyromancy increases the maximum  number of targets of a Pyromancy spell by 1, while reaching Training Level 2 in Cryomancy  increases the maximum severity of the attack penalty inflicted on a target.  

Maximum Action Dice for Spells  

 Your PC’s Attribute Factors and Training Levels determine the maximum number of  Action Dice you can roll when your PC casts a spell in combat. The more Action Dice you roll  for a spell, the greater its effects are likely to be. If your PC has Training Levels in any Magic  Training Disciplines, use the Spell Action Dice Table below to calculate the maximum  number of Action Dice you can roll for each spell your PC knows, and record each number in  the corresponding field in the Spell Action Dice grid on your character sheet.  

Spell Action Dice Table 

Spell Maximum Action Dice per Spell  

Force Arc Intelligence Factor + Force Arc Training Level  

Warp Intelligence Factor + Warp Training Level  

Affinity Faith Factor + Affinity Training Level  

Entropy Faith Factor + Entropy Training Level  

Pyromancy Willpower Factor + Pyromancy Training Level  

Cryomancy 

Willpower Factor + Cryomancy Training Level 

When casting an Essence Magic spell, a PC can draw upon their own life force to  provide additional energy to the spell. The maximum number of additional dice that can be  rolled in this way is equal to the PC’s Training Level in the corresponding Essence Magic 

discipline, and causes the PC to lose an equal number of Hit Points which cannot be  recovered during a Quest. 

Training Table  

The Training Table below shows all of the Training Levels available to new PCs and  the minimum Attribute Score requirements for each.  

Training Table 

Discipline Training Level Minimum  

Training  

Attribute Scores  

Defence Training 

Evasion Training Level 1 Agility 6  

Training Level 2 Agility 10  

Heavy Armour Training Level 1 Endurance 6  

Training Level 2 Endurance 10  

Training Level  

Shields  

Axes  

Hammers  Light Blades  Spears  

Swords  

Training Level 2 Strength 8  Endurance 8  

Weapon Training 

Training Level 1 Strength 6  Agility 6  

Training Level 2 Strength 10  Agility 10  

Training Level 1 Strength 6  Agility 6  

Training Level 2 Strength 10  Agility 10  

Training Level 1 Strength 6  Agility 6  

Training Level 2 Strength 8  Agility 10  

Training Level 1 Strength 6  Agility 6  

Training Level 2 Strength 10  Agility 10  

Training Level 1 Strength 6  Agility 6  

Training Level 2 Strength 10  Agility 10  

Dual Wielding Training Level 1 Strength 8  

Agility 8 

Training Level 2 

Strength 12 

Archery  

Agility 12  

Training Level 1 Strength 6  Agility 8  

Training Level 2 Strength 8  Agility 12  

Magic Training 

Force Arc Training Level 1 Intelligence 8  Training Level 2 Intelligence 12  

Warp Training Level 1 Intelligence 8  Training Level 2 Intelligence 12  

Affinity Training Level 1 Faith 8  Training Level 2 Faith 12  

Entropy Training Level 1 Faith 8  Training Level 2 Faith 12  

Pyromancy Training Level 1 Willpower 8  Training Level 2 Willpower 12  

Cryomancy Training Level 1 Willpower 8 

Training Level 2 

Willpower 12 

Section 3: Equipment  

 Most PCs rely on a selection of weapons and armour to see them safely through each  Quest. This section shows the equipment available to new PCs, and explains how to choose  and record the equipment that a new PC has at the start of play.  

The Equipment Table below shows the equipment available to a new PC, divided into  sections for Armour, Shields, Melee Weapons, Ranged Weapons, and Arcane Catalysts, and  provides information about each item that will be referred to throughout this section.  

Equipment Table 

Armour Weight 

Light Armour 2  

Heavy Armour 4  

Shields Weight Shield Bonus  

Light Shield 2 Training Level  

Heavy Shield 3 Training Level +1  

Melee Weapons Weight Weapon Type  

One-handed Simple Weapon (e.g. crowbar, club) 0.5 Simple  Two-handed Simple Weapon (e.g. quarterstaff) 2 Simple  Light Blade 0.5 Martial  

One-handed Spear 2 Martial  

One-handed Sword 2 Martial  

One-handed Axe 2 Martial  

One-handed Hammer 2 Martial  

Two-handed Spear 2.5 Martial  

Two-handed Sword 2.5 Martial  

Two-handed Axe 3 Martial  

Two-handed Hammer 3 Martial  

Ranged Weapons Weight Weapon Type  

Crossbow 1.5 Simple  

Shortbow 0.5 Martial  

Longbow 1 Martial  

Arcane Catalysts Weight Weapon Type  

Wand Catalyst 0.5 

Staff Catalyst* 

Simple 

*Note: a Staff Catalyst also counts as a two-handed Simple melee weapon.  Starting Equipment  

A new PC begins the game with a selection of the items shown in the Equipment  Table above. You can choose as much equipment for your PC as you like, with the following  restrictions:  

? Every piece of equipment has a weight value, shown in the Weight column of the  Equipment Table. The total weight of a PC’s equipment cannot exceed 18.  

? A PC can only have one set of armour. This can be heavy armour only if the PC has reached  Training Level 1 in the Heavy Armour Training Discipline.  

? A PC can only have one shield.  

? A PC who has any Training Levels in any Arcane Magic Training Disciplines must include at  least one Arcane Catalyst in their starting equipment.  

Sidebar: Just as it’s important to choose Training Levels that complement your PC’s  Attribute Scores, it’s also important to choose equipment for which your PC has Training  Levels.  

Note – Simple weapons: Since Simple weapons are weaker than Martial weapons, there’s  no benefit to taking a Simple melee weapon, even as a backup, if your character has reached  at least Training Level 1 in a particular Martial melee weapon discipline. The same is true for  ranged weapons.  

Once you’ve finalized your PC’s equipment, record each item in the Equipment field on  your character sheet.  

Encumbrance  

Heavy equipment provides various advantages in combat: heavy armour provides a  bonus when shoving or being shoved; heavy weapons generally deal more damage than  lighter weapons; and carrying a shield or additional weapons provides defensive and  offensive flexibility respectively. However, heavy equipment also weighs a PC down, making  it more difficult for them to dodge enemy attacks and spells, and to accomplish feats of 

speed and stealth. Each PC has an Encumbrance Score which represents the extent to which  the weight of their equipment hinders their ability to move quickly and quietly. A PC’s  Encumbrance Score is subtracted from the number of dice rolled when that PC attempts  activities that require fast and precise movements, as well as the number of dice rolled to  avoid enemy attacks and spells when the PC is not wearing heavy armour. The Quest Mode chapter lists all of the actions to which this penalty applies.  

Use the Weight column in the Equipment Table at the start of this section to calculate  the total weight of your PC’s equipment. Then, refer to the Encumbrance Table below to  determine your PC’s Encumbrance score, and record it in the Encumbrance field in the Vital  Statistics grid on your character sheet. The Quest Mode chapter explains how the  Encumbrance score is used during exploration.  

Encumbrance Table 

Total Equipment Weight Encumbrance Score  

0-4.5 0  

5-7.5 1  

8-10.5 2  

11-14.5 3  

15-18 

Maximum Action Dice for Attacks  

Your PC’s weapons, Attribute Factors, and Training Levels determine the maximum  number of Action Dice you can roll when your PC attacks an enemy in combat. The more  Action Dice you roll, the more likely your PC is to hit an enemy, and the more damage they  are likely to deal. Once you have chosen your PC’s weapons, fill in one of the Attack Action  Dice grids on your character sheet for each weapon. Use the Attack Action Dice Table below  to calculate the maximum number of Action Dice you can roll for each of your PC’s weapons.  Record the weapon’s type and whether it is a one-handed or two-handed weapon in the  Weapon field (e.g. Two-handed Axe), and the maximum number of Action Dice in the Action  Dice field. 

Attack Action Dice Table 

Weapon Type Maximum Action Dice per Attack  

Axe Strength Factor + Axes Training Level  

Hammer Strength Factor + Hammers Training Level  Light Blade Agility Factor + Light Blades Training Level  Ranged Agility Factor + Archery Training Level  

Spear Strength Factor + ? Agility Factor + Spears Training Level  Sword Strength Factor + ? Agility Factor + Swords Training Level  Simple Melee Strength Factor  

Simple Ranged 

Agility Factor + Archery Training Level 

  

Dual Wielding  

 If your PC has Training Levels in the Dual Wielding discipline, they can attack using  two one-handed Martial melee weapons of the same type at the same time. They also gain  additional Action Dice that can only be rolled when attacking with two weapons. The  number of additional dice gained depends on the type of weapon and your PC’s Training  Level in Dual Wielding. The Dual Wielding Table below shows the number of additional  Action Dice a character gains when attacking with two weapons of each type.  

Dual Wielding Table 

Weapon Type Additional Action Dice  

Axe Dual Wielding Training Level – 1  

Hammer Dual Wielding Training Level – 1  

Light Blade Dual Wielding Training Level + 1  

Spear Dual Wielding Training Level  

Sword 

Dual Wielding Training Level 

Note: There is no need to record the number of additional dice gained by using two weapons  on your character sheet. 

Defence Dice 

 Your PC’s armour, Attribute Factors, and Training Levels determine how many dice  you roll when your PC is attacked by an enemy, or targeted by an enemy’s magic. These dice  are called Defence Dice, and the more you roll, the less likely your PC is to be hit by an attack 

or affected by a spell. Unlike Action Dice, you’ll roll the maximum number of Defence Dice  every time your PC is attacked. Use the Defence Dice Table below to calculate the number of  Defence Dice for your PC, and record this number in the Defence Dice box on your character  sheet.  

Defence Dice Table 

Armour Number of Defence Dice  

No Armour Agility Factor + Evasion Training Level – Encumbrance Score – 2  Light Armour Agility Factor + Evasion Training Level – Encumbrance Score  

Heavy Armour 

Endurance Factor + Heavy Armour Training Level 

Shield Bonus  

If your PC has Training Levels in the Shields discipline, they gain a number of  additional Defence Dice when using a Shield equal to their Training Level in the Shields  discipline. If your PC has a Shield, simply copy their Training Level in the Shields discipline  into the Shield Bonus field on your character sheet. If a PC uses a Heavy Shield, they can  reroll each Shield Bonus die once each time they are attacked.  

Resistances  

Magic spells, environmental hazards, and certain enemy attacks can inflict non physical damage on PCs. A list of all of the different damage types is given in the Combat  Mode chapter. Mundane armour and weapons provide no resistance to non-physical  damage, but PCs may acquire items that are enchanted to reduce certain types of non physical damage. This protection is written on the item’s data sheet as a damage type  followed by a number – for example, Fire 5. Whenever the PC takes damage of that type, the  amount of damage they take is reduced by the number shown. If a PC acquires any such  equipment, the amount of protection it offers must be recorded in the box marked  Resistances on the PC’s character sheet. If a PC has multiple pieces of equipment that offer  resistance to the same damage type, only the highest number applies. A new PC typically  will not have any items that offer Resistances, so the Resistances field can be left blank.  

 

Section 4: Studies 

On their path to becoming an adventurer, each PC has acquired certain skills and  knowledge, either through instruction or personal experience, that will prove invaluable on  their Quests. Such skills and knowledge are divided into six categories, called Studies.  Studies are used frequently during gameplay in many different ways. Studies can, among  other things: determine whether a PC knows a piece of relevant information regarding their  surroundings or their enemies; determine whether they find a secret, or notice a hazard;  allow them to overcome obstacles; or allow them to identify or interact with other objects  of interest that they encounter, potentially to their benefit or detriment. 

Similar to Training Disciplines, each Study has four Study Levels that represent  increasing expertise. Each PC starts with 2 Study Points which must be spent on Study Levels  before play begins. Just like Training Levels, each Study Level costs 1 Study Point, and a PC  must reach Study Level 1 in a particular Study before they can reach Study Level 2.  Therefore, a new PC begins the game having either reached Study Level 1 in two Studies, or  Study Level 2 in a single Study. After completing Quests, a PC can progress from Study Level  2 to Study Level 3, and finally to Study Level 4.  

A brief summary of each of the six Studies is given below. See the Quest Mode and  Free Mode chapters for a more in-depth explanation of each Study, including when and how  it is used in the game.  

Magic  

Arcane Magic, Invocation, and Essence Magic are not the only types of magic that  exist in the world of Noontide. There are many others: some are ancient, lingering since ages  long forgotten; others are forbidden, their power contingent on a dark bargain with sinister  entities; still others are unique to particular creatures. The Study of Magic consists of  information about these mysterious forces. Although this Study does not enable PCs to use  any additional forms of magic, it does grant the ability to notice, identify, and interact with  magical traps, illusions, and other effects, and to recognize spells being cast by enemies and  other characters. Reaching higher Study Levels in the Study of Magic grants information  about rarer and more esoteric types of magic.

Mechanisms  

The Study of Mechanisms allows PCs to find, identify, disable, and repurpose various  locks, traps, and other mechanical devices. Gaining higher Study Levels in Mechanisms  allows PCs to identify and interact with more complex and better hidden devices.  

Medicine  

All PCs have a limited ability to treat wounds suffered by their allies during a Quest in  order to restore lost Hit Points. The Study of Medicine increases the number of Hit Points a  PC can restore when treating another PC’s wounds, and allows them to diagnose and treat  various diseases, and to identify biological hazards such as toxic substances. It also allows  them to ascertain the cause of death of any unfortunate creature whose remains they may  encounter. As a PC reaches higher Study Levels in Medicine, their skill at treating wounds  increases further, and they learn to recognize a wider variety of ailments and hazards. At  Study Level 4 in Medicine, a PC can treat their own wounds. Treating wounds is explained in  the Quest Mode chapter.  

Monsters  

The Study of Monsters consists of information about the deadly creatures that  plague the lands, including information about their social, feeding, and hunting habits, their  lairs, the nature of the threat they pose, and any weaknesses they may have. It also  determines whether the Party is able to detect hidden monsters, or successfully follow a  monster’s trail. Higher Study Levels grant knowledge about rarer monsters, as well as more  detailed knowledge about more common ones.  

Exploration  

The Study of Exploration encompasses orienteering and navigation, geography,  archaeology, and wilderness survival. When the Party travels through the wilderness, the  Study of Exploration is used to determine how long it takes them to arrive at their  destination. It is also used to detect hidden NPCs; to determine whether the Party can  successfully keep their bearings when exploring an area in which they might become lost; to  glean insights from the geographical features of the Party’s surroundings; and to detect and 

identify secrets and hazards in ancient ruins. Reaching higher Study Levels in the Study of  Exploration allows the Party to travel faster, and increases each of the skills listed above. 

Lore  

 The Study of Lore, unlike the other Studies, is not restricted to any particular subject.  Instead, it consists of any and all knowledge that does not fall within the domain of any  other Study. This knowledge ranges from esoteric to mundane, from specific to vague, and  from impractical to life-saving. However, because of the breadth of knowledge that this  Study represents, higher Study Levels in Lore do not grant specific additional knowledge.  Instead, whether or not a PC knows any information that falls under this Study’s vast  purview is determined by rolling a number of dice equal to their Study Level. For each die  that shows a 5 or a 6, the GM reveals one piece of information.  

 Once you have assigned your PC’s Study Points, record their Study Levels in the  Studies grid on your character sheet.  

  

 

Section 5: Conversation Scores  

Conversations between the Party and NPCs are a core part of Noontide, and  frequently involve attempts by the Party to convince NPCs to agree to a particular request or  demand. In these situations, six numbers called Persuasion Scores are used to determine  whether the Party succeeds or fails to convince the NPCs in question, while three numbers  called Insight Scores are used to determine whether the Party notices subtle clues in an  NPC’s speech, body language, and mannerisms that hint at what the best approach might  be.  

A PC’s Persuasion Scores are based on their Attribute Factors, and their Insight Scores  are based on their Persuasion Scores. Each PC has an individual set of Persuasion Scores,  which are combined with those of the other PCs to form a set for the Party. Similarly, each  PC has an individual set of Insight Scores which are based on their Persuasion Scores, and  these scores are combined to form a set for the Party.  

This section provides a brief description of what each Persuasion Score represents,  and explains how to choose an individual PC’s Persuasion Scores and determine their Insight  Scores in turn. The Challenges chapter explains the rules for conversations between the PCs  and NPCs in detail.  

The Six Persuasion Scores  

Avow  

The Avow Score is used to persuade NPCs by making a promise, or assuring the NPC  that the Party is capable of performing a particular task. How much a promise is worth may  depend on the Party’s reputation and prior behaviour.  

Charm  

The Charm Score is used to persuade NPCs through flattery, by appealing to their  egos, or by trying to impress them. 

Coerce  

The Coerce Score is used to persuade NPCs by threatening violence or other negative  consequences if the NPCs do not comply.  

Deceive  

The Deceive Score is used to persuade NPCs by lying, bluffing, distracting, or  otherwise deliberately misleading or misdirecting them.  

Negotiate  

The Negotiate Score is used to persuade an NPC by offering an exchange – that is,  offering something that the NPC wants, or to do something that the NPC wants done, in  return for something that the NPC has, or something they will do.  

Reason  

The Reason Score is used to persuade an NPC using a calm and level-headed  approach, such as appealing to evidence (or a lack of evidence), describing the possible  consequences of an NPC’s actions (or inaction), or by providing an alternative perspective  that might make the NPC reconsider their behaviour.  

Assigning Persuasion Scores  

Each Persuasion Score is linked to three Attribute Factors (and vice versa), as shown  in the Persuasion Scores Table below. Each of a PC’s Attribute Factors grants a number of  points equal to itself that must be assigned to one or more of the Persuasion Scores to  which it is linked. All of the points granted by a PC’s Attribute Factors must be allocated  among the corresponding Persuasion Scores before play begins.  

Persuasion Scores Table 

Attribute Linked Persuasion Scores  

Strength Avow, Charm, Coerce  

Agility Charm, Deceive, Negotiate  

Endurance Avow, Coerce, Reason  

Intelligence Deceive, Negotiate, Reason  

Faith Charm, Deceive, Reason 

Willpower 

Avow, Coerce, Negotiate 

For example, if a PC has an Intelligence Factor of 3, that PC gains 3 points from that  Factor which must be allocated among their Deceive, Negotiate, and Reason scores. One of  those three Persuasion Scores can be increased by 3, or each of them can be increased by 1,  or one of them can be increased by 2 and another by 1.  

Record your PC’s Persuasion Scores in the Score column of the Persuasion grid on  your character sheet. To check that you have allocated the points from your PC’s Attribute  Factors correctly, calculate the total of your PC’s Persuasion Scores, and then do the same  for their Attribute Factors. The two totals should be the same.  

Persuasion Dice  

When the Party attempts to persuade an NPC, each PC can roll a number of dice,  called Persuasion Dice, to increase the Party’s chance of success. The number of dice rolled  depends on which Persuasion Score the Party uses to convince the NPC in question, and is  equal to the PC’s Persuasion Score divided by 3. When you have finalized your PC’s  Persuasion Scores, divide each of them by 3 and record the results in the Dice column in the  Persuasion grid on your character sheet. 

Persuasion and Personality  

Persuasion Scores represent a PC’s ability to influence NPCs, but they do not  necessarily reflect that PC’s true personality. For example, if your PC has high Strength,  Endurance, and Willpower Scores, you might choose to maximize their Coerce Score, making  them good at persuading NPCs by using threats. This does not necessarily mean that your PC  engages in threatening behaviour all the time, or that they enjoy doing so – it just means  that they know how to be threatening when the situation demands it. Your PC might be shy  and slow to anger; they might be aloof and snobbish; or they might be a vindictive bully  after all. It’s up to you.  

Insight Scores  

Each PC has three Insight Scores, which are used to detect clues in an NPC’s body  language and tone of voice, or hidden in the details of what they say. These can be used to  inform the Party’s approach to persuading the NPC in question, or their decision as to what  to do with any information the NPC provides. The three Insight Scores are Empathy, 

Suspicion, and Deduction. Each score is equal to the average of two particular Persuasion  Scores. Follow the instructions below and record each of your PC’s Insight Scores in the  Insight table on your character sheet.  

Empathy  

The Empathy Score represents a PC’s ability to perceive emotional cues that hint at  an NPC’s motivations, desires, and fears, as well as the strength of the NPC’s trust in the  Party and commitment to their cause. It is based on the Avow and Charm Persuasion Scores  because they reflect a PC’s ability to kindle loyalty and sympathy in others. To calculate your  PC’s Empathy Score, add up their Avow and Charm Scores, then divide the result by 2.  

Suspicion  

The Suspicion Score represents a PC’s ability to spot attempts to deceive or mislead  them, and to sense any underlying hostility that an NPC may bear toward the Party. The  Suspicion Score is based on the Coerce and Deceive Persuasion Scores because a PC that  prefers intimidation and deceit is naturally more adept at detecting and dealing with them.  To calculate your PC’s Suspicion Score, add up their Coerce and Deceive Scores, then divide  the result by 2.  

Deduction  

The Deduction Score represents a PC’s ability to notice falsehoods, oddities, and  inconsistencies in what an NPC says. It is based on the Negotiate and Reason Persuasion  Scores because they represent the degree to which the PC tends toward a logical and  systematic approach when dealing with others. To calculate your PC’s Deduction Score, add  up their Negotiate and Reason Scores, then divide the result by 2.  

 

Section 6: Personal Details  

The last step in creating a PC is to give them a name, and describe their appearance  and any other relevant personal details. With the exception of a name, there is no dedicated  space on the Noontide character sheet for these details, so players can either use the back  of the sheet or keep them somewhere separate. Each player is free to give as much or as  little detail as they wish, but should at least give their PC a name and provide either a brief  description of their physical appearance or an illustration, so that the GM and the other  players can visualize the Party in their minds. Any player who wishes to write a backstory for  their PC should work with the GM to ensure that it makes sense in the context of the game  world. 

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