Organisations that state veganism is healthy

Harvard health 
 
https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/becoming-a-vegetarian 
 
“Traditionally, research into vegetarianism (see context) focused mainly on potential nutritional deficiencies, but in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way, and studies are confirming the health benefits of meat-free eating. Nowadays, plant-based eating is recognized as not only nutritionally sufficient but also as a way to reduce the risk for many chronic illnesses.” 
 
British dietetics association 
 
https://www.bda.uk.com/resource/british-dietetic-association-confirms-well-planned-vegan-diets-can-support-healthy-living-in-people-of-all-ages.html 
 
“Well planned vegetarian diets (see context) can be nutritious and healthy. They are associated with lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, obesity, certain cancers and lower cholesterol levels. This could be because such diets are lower in saturated fat, contain fewer calories and more fiber and phytonutrients/phytochemicals (these can have protective properties) than non-vegetarian diets. (…) Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of life and have many benefits.” 
 
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 
 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27886704/ 
 
“It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that appropriately planned vegetarian, including vegan, diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. These diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, older adulthood, and for athletes.” 
 
Dietitans of Canada 
 
https://www.unlockfood.ca/en/Articles/Vegetarian-and-Vegan-Diets/What-You-Need-to-Know-About-Following-a-Vegan-Eati.aspx 
 
“Anyone can follow a vegan diet – from children to teens to older adults. It’s even healthy for pregnant or nursing mothers. A well-planned vegan diet is high in fibre, vitamins and antioxidants. Plus, it’s low in saturated fat and cholesterol. This healthy combination helps protect against chronic diseases.” 
 
The British National Health Service 
 
(http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Vegetarianhealth/Pages/Vegandiets.aspx) 
 
With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs. 
 
The British Nutrition Foundation 
 
https://www.nutrition.org.uk/healthyliving/helpingyoueatwell/veganandvegetarian.html 
 
Well planned vegetarian and vegan diets can be nutritious and healthy … Studies of UK vegetarian and vegan children have revealed that their growth and development are within the normal range. 
 
The Dietitians Association of Australia 
 
https://daa.asn.au/smart-eating-for-you/smart-eating-fast-facts/healthy-eating/vegan-diets-facts-tips-and-considerations/ 
 
“Vegan diets are a type of vegetarian diet, where only plant-based foods are eaten. With good planning, those following a vegan diet can cover all their nutrient bases, but there are some extra things to consider.” 
 
The United States Department of Agriculture 
 
https://www.choosemyplate.gov/node/5635 
 
“Vegetarian diets (see context) can meet all the recommendations for nutrients. The key is to consume a variety of foods and the right amount of foods to meet your calorie needs. Follow the food group recommendations for your age, sex, and activity level to get the right amount of food and the variety of foods needed for nutrient adequacy. Nutrients that vegetarians may need to focus on include protein, iron, calcium, zinc, and vitamin B12.” 
 
The National Health and Medical Research Council 
 
https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/publications/australian-dietary-guidelines 
 
“Appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthy and nutritionally adequate. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the lifecycle. Those following a strict vegetarian or vegan diet can meet nutrient requirements as long as energy needs are met and an appropriate variety of plant foods are eaten throughout the day” 
 
The Mayo Clinic 
 
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/vegetarian-diet/art-20046446 
 
“A well-planned vegetarian diet (*see context*) can meet the needs of people of all ages, including children, teenagers, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. The key is to be aware of your nutritional needs so that you plan a diet that meets them.” 
 
The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada 
 
https://www.heartandstroke.ca/get-healthy/healthy-eating/specific-diets/for-vegetarians 
 
“Vegetarian diets (*see context*) can provide all the nutrients you need at any age, as well as some additional health benefits.” 
 
https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/vegetarian-and-vegan-diets-q-and-a/ 
 
“With good planning and an understanding of what makes up a healthy, balanced vegetarian and vegan diet, you can get all the nutrients your body needs to be healthy without the need for supplements.” 
 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662288/ 
 
“Research shows that plant-based diets are cost-effective, low-risk interventions that may lower body mass index, blood pressure, HbA1C, and cholesterol levels. They may also reduce the number of medications needed to treat chronic diseases and lower ischemic heart disease mortality rates.” 
 
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 
 
“Recently, vegetarian diets have experienced an increase in popularity. A vegetarian diet is associated with many health benefits because of its higher content of fiber, folic acid, vitamins C and E, potassium, magnesium, and many phytochemicals and a fat content that is more unsaturated. Compared with other vegetarian diets, vegan diets tend to contain less saturated fat and cholesterol and more dietary fiber. Vegans tend to be thinner, have lower serum cholesterol, and lower blood pressure, reducing their risk of heart disease. However, eliminating all animal products from the diet increases the risk of certain nutritional deficiencies. Micronutrients of special concern for the vegan include vitamins B-12 and D, calcium, and long-chain n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids. Unless vegans regularly consume foods that are fortified with these nutrients, appropriate supplements should be consumed. In some cases, iron and zinc status of vegans may also be of concern because of the limited bioavailability of these minerals.” 
 
https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/89/5/1627S/4596952?searchresult=1 
 
“Interventions that may lower body mass index, blood pressure, HbA1C, and cholesterol levels. They may also reduce the number of medications needed to treat chronic diseases and lower ischemic heart disease mortality rates. Physicians should consider recommending a plant-based diet to all their patients, especially those with high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or obesity.” 
 
http://www.thepermanentejournal.org/issues/2013/spring/5117-nutrition.html 
 
American Institute for cancer research 
 
https://www.aicr.org/cancer-prevention/food-facts/vegan-diet/#:~:text=Overall%20Cancer.,focus%20on%20whole%20plant%20foods. 
 
“In some studies, vegan diets seem to be associated with the best long-term health, and they’re the only dietary pattern that’s been linked with reversal of atherosclerosis in very limited subjects.  
 
http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/healthy-diet 
 
Here are a few other studies just to throw around for fun: 
 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK396513/ 
 
“vegan diets can be nutritionally adequate, but that vegans must make sure to consume foods that contain adequate amounts of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids” 
 
https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/89/5/1627S/4596952 
 
https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/6/3/1318 
 
And here are the results of the largest study ever conducted on the topic: 
 
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9860369/
 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *