Scrolls of Omon Tye RPG – Rulebook

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OmonTyeScroll.png

Scrolls of Omon Tye

Generic D6 Based Role Playing Game System

GAME MASTER’S GUIDE

PREAMBLE

Scrolls of Omon Tye – or shortened to SOOT – came about through wanting a more heroic feel to a role-playing system, where you had more luck with achieving the things you feel you should be able to do.

This mostly involved a change from using d20 dice to four d6 dice, increasing the probability of ‘average’ or midrange rolls – and thus giving the feel that average tasks are nearly always achievable.

The second major change is the removal of classes and simply using Experience from playing to purchase Skills and other upgrades. This grants Players multitudes more flexibility for advancing their Characters.

Finally the last major change was removing the so-called “Ability Scores” and simply using their translations, the “Ability Modifiers” instead. This cuts down on complexity, as there is no need to translate a large arbitrary number into a small number in order to modify the numbers you roll.

Simply put, Scrolls of Omon Tye is meant as a speedy rendition of popular d20 Systems, in all aspects.

The World of Aliisen

This sister project has been developed alongside these rules, giving a Player a place to immediately jump into when picking the system up to play.

The world is not complete, however, and each game run by the Creator progresses the world in some way. In fact, the name Omon Tye is a moniker of the Creator, both in actuality and fictionally.

You can find more information about Aliisen here:

https://sites.google.com/site/worldofaliisen/

CONTENTS PAGE

CHAPTER ONE: GAMEPLAY

THE DICE MECHANIC

ACTIONS, TURNS AND ROUNDS

ENCOUNTERS, ADVENTURES AND CAMPAIGNS

BATTLE

STATUS EFFECTS

HEALING

DYING, INJURIES AND DEATH

LOOTING

BASIC LOOT TABLES

CHAPTER TWO: CHARACTER CREATION

ATTRIBUTES

CHAPTER THREE: PROFICIENCIES, FEATS AND SKILLS

EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING

BEGINNING CHARACTER INABILITIES

CHAPTER FOUR: PERSONAL EQUIPMENT

MELEE WEAPON SPECIFICS

RANGED WEAPON SPECIFICS

SHIELD SPECIFICS

ARMOUR SPECIFICS

MOUNTS

CHAPTER FIVE: MAGIC

USING MAGIC TO ATTACK

ENCHANTING WEAPONS AND ARMOUR

CHAPTER SIX: CRAFTING AND REPAIRING

ENHANCED EQUIPMENT

TABLE OF MATERIALS

TABLE OF TOOLS

TABLE OF RECIPES


CHAPTER ONE: GAMEPLAY

THE DICE MECHANIC

To begin with, the acronym DV stands for Difficulty Value and refers to the value you must roll to overcome.
Usually, the DV is not known, but most average tasks have a DV of 15. After a while, the Players may start to remember some repetitive DVs but should never know for certain what number they are trying to beat. This is so that it is a risk to take Recovery Dice, explained later.

The dice roll is the core mechanic of the game, where the result determines whether the character succeeds or fails. 


To achieve an action, you roll 4 six-sided dice (4d6) and add your relevant Attribute to the final result. If there are any 1s rolled, those dice are ignored. 

As appropriate, your opponents counter-roll using the same method. The final result is compared to either the DV for the action or the opponent’s roll.

A result of more than 20 without modifiers is considered a Critical Roll, which in most situations gives a benefit to the character. This number can be changed through some skills.

WILLPOWER CHECK

This specific type of dice roll refers to when a Character tries to remove a hindrance or stop an effect from occurring, such as bleeding to death, escaping a grapple or falling.

When performing a Willpower Check, you will add your Willpower modifier to the roll.
Most Willpower Check DVs are 15.

RECOVERY DICE

Each time you roll your 4 dice to attempt an action, you will ignore any rolls of 1 as they are regarded as a Fumble. Usually, whatever you roll is then set in stone.

However with enough Recovery Dice available, you may spend those points to re-roll a Fumble.

To obtain Recovery points, you can remove a single die that has rolled 3 or higher before comparing to the Difficulty Value. Removing a die gives you 1 Recovery Dice.

You cannot take Recovery Dice from Damage dice.

To re-roll, you remove a point for every die you want to re-roll. The maximum amount of Recovery Dice you may have at any time is 6

For those wishing to know the chances of each result using this rolling method, this table describes such results.

As shown, the most likely values resulting from 4x 6-sided dice are between 9 and 18. In this system, the average Difficulty Value is 15.

For a character attempting an average action with no modifiers, they have an approximate 70% chance of succeeding.

This makes for a game where in most simple or mundane situations the Players will succeed, but in complex and dangerous situations they must work harder and use all that they have to their advantage to make it through.


ACTIONS, TURNS AND ROUNDS

The Game revolves around Players making Actions, having Turns and completing Rounds. Every Player chooses a number of Actions for their Character to perform during their Turn, dice may be rolled and the Game Master tells them the result, then it moves on to the next Player’s Turn. 

This continues (in the order of Initiative) until each Player, Enemy and NPC has had their Turn, then the Round ends. Any Game Events that occur are also explained during the Round and the next Round starts with the first Character performing their Action.

Actions are separated into a number of categories, including attacking and moving, and are explained in the next chapter. Actions are the Players’ link to their Characters and the virtual world.

PERCEPTION-BASED INITIATIVE

The order in which you take Turns is based on your Perception attribute. Having a high Perception allows you to take your turn earlier than those with a low Perception. 

To determine the exact order, you roll your four dice and add your Perception score. Your Perception and your Initiative can have modifiers set on them at any time.

ADVANTAGE AND DISADVANTAGE

Sometimes an effect will give either of these statuses to a player; Advantage grants the Player an extra die to roll for Actions whereas Disadvantage removes a die for Actions.

These effects cancel each other out.

Double Dis/Advantage exists for very potent situations.

ENCOUNTERS, ADVENTURES AND CAMPAIGNS

As is fairly common in role playing tabletop games, this system uses Encounters, Adventures and Campaigns.

An Encounter is usually made up of Rounds – the time at which each Player and Enemy takes their turns.

Adventures can go for much longer than an Encounter and they can be much more thrilling. An Adventure can have any number of Encounters in it but will have at least one major goal for the players. It won’t be as big as ‘Saving the World’, more like ‘Go Save the Boy’ or ‘Find My Lost Item’ or ‘Fix This Thing’. Some people call these Questlines.

Finally, the Campaign is the total playtime of the Characters – from start to finish – on many great Adventures. They could be ‘Stopping the Insane King’ or ‘Killing the Zombie Army’ … or simply just saving the world.


BATTLE

Battle is where the characters face their foes in a fight that usually ends in death and bloodshed. At the beginning of the battle, the Game Master should tell the PCs where each ally and opponent is located, the nature of the battlefield and any notable objects or situations that happen.

Battlefields are normally represented by a sheet of squares or sometimes hexes. SoOT refers to them as spaces in this rulebook.

TIME LIMITING

Each turn takes 10 seconds in game-time, allowing characters to perform particular things within the time limit. You are not required to ‘use up’ all the time in your Turn and you may Hold to change the order of your Turn.

ACTION PERFORMED

TIME REQUIRED

(seconds)

Standard attack

6

Casting Magic

(variable)

Use of a Feat

6

Other Major Action

6

Moving 1 space

2

Minor Action

2

Reloading crossbow

2

MOVEMENT

Each Character may move across open spaces and may not end their turn ‘on top of’ another person.

Once they are in an enemy’s range, moving more than one space away from them in one turn provokes an Open Attack – meaning that the enemy sees a brief opportunity to attack them.

Moving diagonally counts as 1 space.

For realism’s sake, it is considered that each character will remove any large bags or containers when they enter combat, leave them in a safe place, and retrieve them after combat so as to not damage the contents nor restrict their movements and attacks when fighting.

ATTACKING AND DEFENDING

Attacking and Defending is arguably the most important part of Battle. With the many weapons, shields and armour available, Battle can become quite heated both In and Out of the Game. This system aims to resolve Turns quickly, as Battle is a very short happening in reality.

To Attack, both opponents roll dice against the other, with modifiers added. On a successful hit, Damage is calculated.

Damage calculations are done by rolling the amount of dice specified in the weapon attributes. The difference in dice amounts reflects how your weapon might be more effective in combat compared to another’s.

For using Magic to attack, see the chapter on Magic.

For ranged weapons, nocking another arrow or reloading a sling is included in the 6-second Standard Attack, whereas loading a bolt into a crossbow takes an extra 2 seconds.


ATTACKING IN MELEE

When using a melee weapon – such as a sword – the difficulty value of one’s attack is the defence roll of the opponent. That is, both the attacker and defender roll dice and add modifiers in to overcome the other. The basic method follows for melee attacks:

  1. The attacker rolls and adds his Toughness score;

  1. The defender rolls and adds his relevant Attribute score:
    If the defender is blocking, use Toughness.
    If they are dodging, use Dexterity.

  1. The rolls are compared and the higher value wins out.

If the attacker’s roll is lower than the defender’s, then the attack is blocked.

If the attacker’s result is a Critical Strike as well as higher than the Defender’s roll, the Defender is affected by a relevant Status Effect.

You can attempt to block a Melee weapon with a Ranged weapon, but doing so may damage the Ranged weapon.

OPEN ATTACKS

Open Attacks occur when one opponent lowers his defence, purposely or accidentally, in a heated melee battle. 

Actions that provoke Open Attacks include:

  • moving more than 1 space away from an attacking enemy in a single turn once inside their melee range; and

  • performing an action that is arguably not related to combat, such as opening a door or drinking a potion, whilst in melee range of an attacking enemy 

ATTACKING AT RANGE

When firing or throwing weapons, same as in melee, the attacker and defender roll dice to overcome each other. 

  1. The attacker rolls and adds his Dexterity score;

  2. The defender rolls and adds his relevant Attribute score:
    If the defender is blocking, use Toughness.
    If they are dodging, use Dexterity.

  1. The rolls are compared and the higher value wins out.

If the attacker’s roll is lower than the defender’s, then the attack misses.

If the attacker’s result is a Critical Strike as well as higher than the Defender’s roll, the Defender is affected by a relevant Status Effect.

TAKING DAMAGE WITH ARMOUR

The very last step of Combat is when you take Damage – or not. Simply put, if the damage dealt is more than the Armour Points, then you receive that damage.


CALLED SHOTS

The Ranged Feat Called Shot allows the attacker to attempt to strike a particular location for an additional effect. The table below details the difficulties and effects.

LOCATION

DIFFICULTY VALUE

RESULT

Part of Head, Face or Neck

DV20

Loss of a sense (Blinded, Deaf, Silenced) +3d6 Damage

Part of Torso or Abdomen

DV15

Standard damage

Limb or Hand/Foot

DV18

Impaled Status Effect

Vital Organ

DV20

+3d6 damage and Impaled

Weapon/Item

DV20

Drops the items, 1d6 Damage total

STATUS EFFECTS

Status Effects are physical, mental or emotional states that a character can have. Each affects the character in a particular way. 

Blinded
Cannot see until told otherwise, usually has a duration of rounds.

Deaf
Unable to hear until told otherwise, usually has a duration of rounds.

Fearful
When you are next able, you move 1d6 spaces away from the Enemy that caused this status.

Grappled
Being held by another, causing -2 Dexterity and cannot move.

Paralyzed
Whether magically or in shock, cannot make any action, move or talk until this status is removed.

Mentally Drained
You feel magically exhausted and cannot cast spells, -1 Intelligence.

Rooted
You are unable to move from where you are.

Slowed
It costs you twice as much time to move as normal.

Stunned
Dazed and confused, sometimes kneeling or lying on the ground, unable to act. Usually has a round duration.

Surprised
Skip your next turn. Can occur consecutively.

Unbalanced
Can only move 1 space next turn, cannot attack, defend or dodge. 

Unconscious
Until further notice, usually has a duration. Can be woken by a DV20 Perception roll or external means 

INJURIES AND BLOOD LOSS

These Status Effects are associated with losing Hit Points, usually from combat.

Bleeding:
Losing blood at a rapid rate. Each turn, Willpower Check or lose HP. If resting, HP loss occurs every minute regardless.

Caused by falling below half of your maximum health through Damage by Weapons.

Exhausted:
-1 Toughness. Caused by falling below half of your maximum health in any way. 

Burning
-2d6+2 HP every turn until dead or extinguished. Caused by fireballs and the like.

Crushed – Body Part
Willpower Check to use that body part until it’s mended. Caused by critical hits by Crushing weapons.

Dead
No longer breathing nor heart beating, you cannot take actions. May be revived in the right circumstances.

Destroyed
When at less than -10 hit points. There is no recovery from this state.
You must be resurrected through magic to continue.

Impaled – Body part
Willpower Check to use that body part unless healed.

Caused by piercing weapons and ranged projectiles.
Removing the item that which has caused the Impaling can cause Bleeding.

Mortally Wounded
When at less than 10 hit points. Each turn Willpower Check, fail 3 times and you lose consciousness and drop to 0 HP.
After 5 combat turns or 2 minutes you are Dead.

Poisoned
Take an amount of damage each round. Caused by magic and poisonous/toxic items.

HEALING

Adventuring isn’t all fighting and looting, at some point you are going to get hurt. So you had better prepare to rest up and down some health potions and eat some food, because otherwise you might not make it back to the town.

Hit Points in this system represents the overall state of the body, not specifically how many strikes it takes to kill you. For example, cutting off a limb in a single blow would immediately quarter your HP. Having a large amount of HP does not mean you can take on fifty low level mooks. Any enemy can deal significant damage, and you can be killed in the most unimpressive ways.

RESTING

You may rest for an Extended period of time, that is, sitting down outside of combat for an hour in game-time and you will recover 2d6 Hit Points. Short Rests of half an hour will regain 1d6 HP (which you can do twice non-consecutively) but you cannot regain any more through simple non-magical means until you see a doctor or physician. Potions recover 2d6 HP.

Major injuries, such as broken bones, large wounds, massive trauma etc will not heal by resting and must be examined.

In addition, Short Rests will replenish 3 Magic Points, as many times per day. Extended Rests replenish 6 MP.

DYING, INJURIES AND DEATH

If you happen to lose half of your health points by taking damage by weapons, you are considered to be Bleeding. This means that after a certain amount of rounds, you can die from blood loss. You must see someone with aiding skills to be healed, or conversely you could drink a Health Potion. You cannot rest to regain HP at this point.

If you fall below half of your hit points at any time, you are Exhausted. You can be Bleeding and Exhausted.

If you happen to lose enough health points to fall below 10 HP, this means you are Mortally Wounded and likely to lose consciousness. At this point you can die if not tended to. If you are still being attacked after hitting zero, or you take enough damage to push you under zero, up until negative ten you stay Mortally Wounded until your Willpower Checks are resolved.

Being Mortally Wounded means you roll a Willpower Check to stay that way. Failing this three times (during 5 real-time minutes if out of combat) or going below 0 Hit Points, you are Dead.

If you are sent below negative ten points at any time, you simply perish then and there and are considered Destroyed.

INJURY STATE

Modifier

HP Loss

Bleeding – when at half or less hit points. See Injuries on the prev. page.

-1

Exhausted – when at half or less hit points.

-1 TGH

Mortally Wounded – when below 10 hit points. Requires Willpower Checks.

Dead – Failed Willpower Check. Not breathing, cannot take actions. May be revived.

Destroyed – when at less than -10 hit points. Must be resurrected through magic.


LOOTING

At the end of battles, each player may receive items. The Game Master decides the exact nature of this loot event, but there is a Loot Table further on.

INVENTORY

You inventory is the space upon your person where you can store or wear items, armour, weapons and items. It can be increased in size from just your hands and pockets with sacks, bags and belt pouches.

Most weapons bought from stores, merchants and the like come with scabbards and sheaths to hold them, but looted weapons have a chance of not having a matching holder. Every container has a limit on how much it can hold, and reaching this limit makes you Encumbered and slow.

Containers can only be so large and contain so much, but there is no number associated with the exact capacity. The amount of items you may carry is up to the Game Master.

You cannot carry more than 3 Large Weapons unless they are packed away. The same restriction applies for more than 5 Medium Weapons. 

FOOD AND DRINK

Each day, you must consume at least one meal of food, or be dealt negative modifiers to your attributes and hit points.

The following effects ‘stack’ – meaning that each day’s effect is in addition to the effect of the day before.

Number of Days

Attribute Modifier

Max HP Reduction

1

TGH -1

-3

2

TGH DEX INT -1

-5

3

DEX INT PER -1

-7

4

TGH DEX PER -1

-10

5

Death


BASIC LOOT TABLES

2d6

List 1 – Ranged Items

List 2 – Containers

List 3 – Shields

List 4 – Misc Items

1

Arrow

Backpack (20)

Buckler, Wooden

Blank Parchment

2

Bolt

Satchel (10)

Buckler, Metal

Firewood

3

Dart

Ammo Case (24)

Round Shield, Wooden

Lantern

4

Sling Stone

Scroll Case (3)

Round Shield, Metal

Lantern Oil (1 hr)

5

Throwing Knife

Money Pouch

Heater Shield, Wooden

Torch

6

Nothing

Nothing

Nothing

Nothing

1

Throwing Axe

Large Waterskin (2 pints)

Improvised Shield

Leather scraps

2

Throwing Hammer

Waterskin (1 pint)

Heater Shield, Metal

Tinderbox

3

Rope Net

Cloth Sack, Lrg (15)

Kite Shield, Wooden

Feather Quill

4

Shuriken

Cloth Sack, Sml (10)

Kite Shield, Metal

Compass

5

Javelin

Leather Belt Pouch, Lrg

Tower Shield, Wooden

Empty Flask (1 pint)

6

Spear

Leather Belt Pouch, Sml

Tower Shield, Metal

Bag of Sand (3 uses)

2d6

List 5 – Food & Drink

List 6 – Fruit & Veg

List 7 – Materials 1

List 8 – Materials 2

1

Bag of berries

Apple

Arrow shaft

Tanned leather, Lrg

2

Bag of nuts

Cabbage

Arrow tip

Tanned leather, Sml

3

Half-full bottle of alcohol

Carrot

Fletching

Tooling leather, Lrg

4

Corn cob

Full hide, large

Tooling leather, Sml

5

Grapes

Full hide, small

Metal plating, Lrg

6

Nothing

Nothing

Nothing

1

2

Bread

Lettuce

Iron ingot

Metal plating, sml

3

Cheese

Onion

Spool of iron wire

Metal scales

4

Eggs

Potato

Leather lacing

Rivets

5

Rations

Radish

Leather strinps

Sewing thread

6

Salted fish

Mouldy fruit

Waxed leather thread

Spool of string

2d6

List 9 – Armour 1

List 10 – Armour 2

List 11 – Weapons 1

List 12 – Weapons 2

1

Dagger / Knife

Whip / Hand chain

2

Sabre / Falchion

Sling

3

Arming Sword

Short / Horse bow

4

Bastard Sword / Rapier

Long / Greatbow

5

Longsword / Greatsword

Crossbow

6

Nothing

Nothing

1

Reroll

Reroll

2

Handaxe / Hammer

Heavy / Repeating Crossbow

3

Battleaxe / Greataxe

Spear / Quarterstaff

4

Club / Mace / Baton

Trident

5

Morningstar / Flail

Glaive / Halberd

6

Warhammer / Maul

War Scythe / War Pick

CHAPTER TWO: CHARACTER CREATION

A Character is the entity that a Player has control over. This does not necessarily have to be a human being or even something living if you so desire. But each Character has the same details about them:

  • The Name of the Character.

  • Which Race the character is.

  • Experience
    An arbitrary number representing the Character’s progress towards a milestone increase of power or skill.
    Beginning Characters start with 20 points to be spent prior to playing the game

  • Attributes
    The 6 Attributes of a Character define their strengths and weaknesses

  • Hit Points
    The amount of Damage they can take before death. Characters begin with 20 HP plus your Toughness score as dice.

  • Magic Points
    How many spells a character may cast until they are mentally exhausted.
    Starting with 20 plus your Intelligence score as dice.

  • Currency
    How much money your character begins with. Starting value varies.

  • Inventory
    Where they put their equipment and loot. Ensure your character has a bag of some kind.

ATTRIBUTES

The six Attributes are Toughness, Dexterity, Charisma, Perception, Intelligence and Logic.

Different races have different amounts of attribute points to spend at creation.

The amount of points spent on your Attributes should add up to 6, and at any time during the game, each Attribute’s points may not exceed 6.

Toughness defines how strong and powerful a character is, increasing your health.

Dexterity defines how flexible they can be and how easily they can use complex items and weapons.

Charisma is how social and persuasive they are, or comparatively how frightening they can be.

Perception is your ability of sensing the situation and environment around you.

Intelligence refers to the usage of Magic as well as solving puzzles, riddles and dealing with traps.

Willpower refers to how far your body and mind can be pushed, deliberately or in resistance.

CHAPTER THREE: PROFICIENCIES, FEATS AND SKILLS

For the complete list of Proficiencies, Feats and Skills, see the corresponding Skillbook.

Feats are things that a character may perform for a benefit and are generally physical things.

Skills are the things they are good at rather than things they can do.

Racial Traits can be either skill or feat and are given at character creation.

EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING

Experience Points are gained through your character’s actions for everything they do. However, the Points you gain may only apply to the Proficiency that you are Training. 

At the beginning of your adventure and after every long rest, you may select a Proficiency that you are Training.

The amount of Experience required for various things depends on how fast or slow your Game Master wishes you to progress.

There is a cap on the amount of Experience you can pool together and once you reach that cap you do not gain any more, regardless of achieving methods where you usually earn Experience.

STANDARD EXPERIENCE GAIN PER SITUATION

Generally, for every completed encounter a character may earn 2 Experience Points.

Earning 10 points all at once would be considered a very big deal, regardless of the Pace.

SKILL OR FEAT

+2 HP/MP

ATTRIBUTE +1

MAGIC TIER INCREASE

LEARN SPELL

EXP CAP

SLOW PACE

15

10

30

20

10xTier

30

REGULAR PACE

10

4

20

15

5xTier

20

FAST PACE

5

2

10

10

2xTier

10

To see the Proficiencies in detail, check the Skills and Magic rulebook.


BEGINNING CHARACTER INABILITIES

The following is a list of basic actions and consequences that characters with low-levels of experience must deal with.

Through earning experience and improving their Proficiencies, characters may remove these consequences.

Climbing
DV18, must have handholds, if over AP5 then DV20

Dual Wielding
-2 modifier on attempt roll

Fleet of Foot
DV15 +AP to dodge an attack

Jumping or Leaping
DV18 to succeed, if over AP5 then DV20

Low Obstacles
DV15 to overcome, if over AP5 then DV18

Swimming
DV18 plus AP to succeed

Moving with AP 6 or more
Slowed status effect (half movement ‘speed’)


CHAPTER FOUR: PERSONAL EQUIPMENT

Most items in the world can be used as a weapon or shield, provided you can hold it properly. All weapon Damage is specified as Modifiers to the Damage roll, with smaller or less effective weapons having minus modifiers and very effective weapons having positive modifiers. 

Most weapons also apply Status Effects..

Shields and Armour provide the user with additional Armour Points, the number which must be overcome to deal Hit Point Damage in battle. Each of these have resistances to particular Damage types.

Weapons marked with an asterisk* require 2 hands.

MELEE WEAPON SPECIFICS

WEAPON NAME

DAMAGE 

RANGE

(BETWEEN)

VALUE

1-10

SIZE

EFFECT
ON CRITICAL HIT

Unarmed

1d6-1

0

Grappled

Knife

1d6-2

Throw 2

1

Small

Impaled

Dagger / Dirk

1d6-1

Throw 2

1

Small

Impaled

Arming Sword

1d6-1

2

Medium

Double Damage

Broadsword

1d6

2

Large

Double Damage

Bastard Sword

2d6

1

3

Large

Double Damage

Sabre / Falchion

1d6

3

Large

Double Damage

Rapier

1d6

1

5

Large

Impaled

Longsword*

2d6

1

7

Large

Crushed

Handaxe

1d6

1

Small

Double Damage

Battleaxe

1d6+3

3

Medium

Unbalanced

Greataxe*

2d6

1

7

Large

Double Damage

Club

1d6

1

Medium

Unbalanced

Mace

2d6

2

Medium

Crushed

Morningstar

2d6

4

Medium

Crushed

Warhammer*

2d6

1

7

Large

Unbalanced

Maul*

2d6

1

7

Large

Crushed

Whip

1d6-1

1

1

Small

+1d6 Damage

Flail

2d6

3

Large

Stunned 1

Spear

1d6+2

1

2

Large

Impaled

Quarterstaff*

1d6

1

1

Large

Stunned 1

Trident

2d6

1

7

Large

Impaled

Glaive*

2d6

1

6

Large

Double Damage

Halberd*

2d6

1

6

Large

Double Damage

War Scythe*

1d6+2

1

7

Large

Double Damage

RANGED WEAPON SPECIFICS

WEAPON NAME

DAMAGE

RANGE
(BETWEEN)

VALUE 1-10

SIZE

STATUS EFFECT
ON CRITICAL HIT

Sling

1d6-1

6

1

Stunned 2

Shortbow / Horsebow

1d6

8

3

Medium

Impaled

Longbow

2d6

10

4

Large

Impaled

Greatbow / Yumi

2d6+2

12

7

Large

Impaled + Knockback 1

Crossbow / Repeating Crossbow

2d6

8

6

Medium

Impaled

Heavy Crossbow

3d6

10

7

Medium

Impaled + Knockback 1

Javelin

2d6

6

2

Large

Impaled + Knockback 1

Spear

1d6

4

2

Large

Impaled

Throwing Knife / Dagger

1d6-2

5

1

Small

Impaled

Throwing Axe

1d6-1

4

2

Small

Impaled

Throwing Hammer

1d6-1

4

2

Small

Stunned 1

Dart / Shuriken

1d6-2

3

1

Impaled

Rope Net

No damage

2

3

Medium

Grappled

SHIELD SPECIFICS

Having a shield in your hand allows you to block melee strikes easier, and will refute damage.

ITEM NAME

ARMOUR POINTS

DAMAGE

SIZE

Improvised Shield

1

+0

Small

Buckler

1

+0

Small

Round Shield

2

+0

Medium

Heater Shield

3

+0

Medium

Kite Shield

4

+1

Medium

Tower Shield

5

+1

Large


ARMOUR SPECIFICS

While wearing Armour totalling 6 or more Points you are Slowed.

In reality, greaves and boots are compatible and worn together. In this system, greaves includes a set of footwear.

In addition, torso armour is considered to also cover the shoulders, upper arms and thighs. 

Lastly, the maximum amount of Armour Points you can earn through Armour (including shields) is capped at 10 points.

If the sum of your Armour Points is more than 10, they are capped at 10. If for whatever reason your Armour Points are decreased, the ‘extra points’ are NOT taken into account.

For example, Bill is wearing a Breastplate and Plate Helmet, Gauntlets and Greaves – adding up to 12. If Bill is affected by the Skill Armour Means Nothing then his total is reduced from the cap 10 down to 9.

Not from 12 to 11, then rounded down to 10.

ARMOUR NAME

ARMOUR POINTS

BODY LOCATION

Clothing

0

Torso and Legs

Padded Gauntlets/Greaves

1

Arms/Legs

Gambeson / Padded Jack

3

Torso

Hardened Leather Jack

4

Torso

H. Leather Gauntlets/Greaves

1

Arms/Legs

H. Leather Helm

1

Head

Brigandine

5

Torso

Maille Gloves / Greaves

1

Arms/Legs

Maille Hood

2

Head

Maille Hauberk

5

Torso

Reinforced Maille

5

Torso

Scale Gauntlets/Greaves

1

Arms/Legs

Scale Shirt

5

Torso

Plate Gauntlets / Greaves

2

Arms/Legs

Plate Helmet

2

Head

Breastplate

6

Torso

MOUNTS

Not exactly equipment, but useful regardless, a mount can be simply a horse or mule or perhaps less common a camel or a wyvern. Mounts don’t have to be bestial either, for example you could ride a mechanical cart.

The rider may attempt combat actions while riding, but receives a -2 for actions requiring Dexterity.

If the mount is not saddled, forcing the rider to ride bareback, the Dexterity required is increased by 1.

MOUNT NAME

DEX REQ

Work Horse

1

Traveller’s Horse

2

Pack Mule

0

War Horse

3

Beast

4

Improvised/Mechanical

3

CHAPTER FIVE: MAGIC

Anyone can tell you that Magic has been used by those with the Skill for eons. Simple incantations and the intricate waving of fingers forms the basis of the art, but only beings born with the Skill are able to bend it to their will. 

Not only do you need the Skill to use Magic, but also knowledge of the Incantation and an adequate amount of innate magical energy within yourself to cast a particular spell.

Unfortunately for Magic-users, casting tends to conflict with heavy armours, mostly that of metal but rarely it can also fail – or backfire – while wearing any sort of clothing thicker than simple cloths. As such, magic-users shouldn’t wear armour unless they know precisely what they are doing.

Magic-users are usually taught in one of three different Pathways of Magic, intended to focus their skill in a particular fashion beneficial to their more common circumstances. Those who do not follow a Pathway are simply Mages.

Choosing a Pathway
Simply choose a Pathway (or not) when you gain either the Combat or Support Magic Tier 1 Proficiencies.
In addition, to gain each Tier’s benefits, you must have already gained the previous Tier’s benefits.

Learning Spells
In order to gain the use of a spell, you must learn it from another being or from a source from which you can teach yourself, such as a book or drawing. You cannot simply receive a spell through spending experience.
Upon Character Creation, you may receive the same number of Spells in each Tier as your Intelligence.

Wizard’s Scrolls
For those choosing this Pathway, in order to cast spells you must first imbue a Scroll with your magical energy.
Each Scroll is created in exactly the same manner as casting the spell – you are casting it onto the Scroll.

Doing so costs the same Mana as usual. At first, Scrolls can only contain a single spell and disintegrate after use

NAME

Sorcery
A Sorcerer or Sorceress

Wizardry

A Wizard or Witch

Religion
A Priest of Priestess

Description

Master of instant casting and minimal expenditure of magic.

Learned Scholars who can call upon powerful magics

One who prays to deities and channels their God’s powers

Tier 1

Requires

INT 1

Cantrips take 2 seconds less time to cast than normal


Non-Cantrip Magic costs 

increase by 1

All spells take 2 seconds less time to cast than normal


Only Casting Scrolls costs magic


Can only cast from Scrolls

Non-Cantrips take 3 seconds 

less time to cast than normal

All Magic costs increase by 1

Add +1d6 to Healing Spells

Tier 2

Requires

INT 2

For every permanent increase of MP, double the amount increased

If you roll a 6 for Damage

add another die roll

Scrolls you create may contain 

up to 3 spells on them

Can cast Cantrips without scrolls for double the Magic cost

You may cast while wearing Armour and suffer no penalty

Casting affects multiple targets provided you touch them all

Tier 3

Requires

INT 3

Cantrips cost no Magic to cast

All Spells except Cantrips take half as much time to cast

Scrolls may be used twice 

before they are expended

You can create Trap Scrolls

You cannot be interrupted 

while casting a spell

Extended Rests regain all Mana

Master

(Tier 4)

Requires

INT 4

Tier 1 Spells cost no Magic to cast.

All 1s become 2s regarding Magic

You may target a Scroll with the Refresh spell, which refreshes all uses of the Scroll as if it were newly made

Once per day, you may cast a single Tier 3 or 4 spell for no Magic cost

USING MAGIC TO ATTACK

Magic not only does interesting things inside and outside of combat, but can also be used to damage your opponents, bypassing their armour. 

When rolling for casting Magic, minus Armour Points from the dice roll.

Casting touch magic nearly cannot fail, so the dice rolls have no difficulty score to compare against. Simply, as long as the caster does not Fumble (any 1s), they will succeed.

Casting Ranged magic is a little more difficult, as you must direct the spell at your target and hope it strikes them.

Magic attacks have a range of your DEX + INT doubled, with a minimum range of 2 and maximum of 8 spaces.

RANGED MAGIC ATTACK

This is determined by rolling 4d6 + INT + DEX ( – AP), against the opponents’ 4d6 + DEX.

  1. To cast, roll dice and add modifiers.

    1. Caster: +INT +DEX -AP

    2. Defender: +DEX

  2. After casting, the amount of Mana or Magic Points lost is determined by the Tier of Magic:

    1. Cantrip: 1d6 -2

    2. Tier 1: 1d6

    3. Tier 2: 2d6

    4. Tier 3: 3d6

ENCHANTING WEAPONS AND ARMOUR

TO BE WRITTEN


CHAPTER SIX: CRAFTING AND REPAIRING

With the correct skills, tools, materials and time, you can create weapons, armour and ammunition. Crafting Materials are described on the next page. 

The duration to craft or repair an item is determined by rolling 1d6 and is in game hours. Some Proficiencies give bonuses to crafting and repairing

The process of creating an item is not a guaranteed success: any rolls of 1 mean you fail the work and end up with a mostly useless item. Three dice rolls are required for crafting, with the following results:

DICE ROLL

EFFECT

2-5

+1 hour to craft

6-20

No effect

21-30

+1 Damage Dice

Repairing an item is the same as creating one, with the following results:

DICE ROLL

EFFECT

2-5

+?  hour to repair

6-20

No effect

21-30

+1 Damage Dice

ENHANCED EQUIPMENT 

The following table shows the Enhancements that may be applied to equipment.

WEAPON

ARMOUR


TABLE OF MATERIALS

This table shows the name, price and craft each material is used in.

ITEM NAME

COST

CRAFT

Arrow shaft

2cp ea

Fletching

Arrow tip

1cp ea

Fletching

Fletch (Flight)

1cp ea

Fletching

Full hide, large

6gp

Leatherworking

Full hide, small

2gp

Leatherworking

Iron ingot

1gp

Metalworking

Leather lacing

2sp per ft

Leatherworking, Metalworking

Leather strips

1sp ea

Leatherworking

Metal plating, Lrg

3gp

Metalworking

Metal plating, sml

1gp

Metalworking

Metal scales

1cp per 10

Metalworking

Rivets

1gp per 100

Leatherworking, Metalworking

Sewing thread

5cp

Sewing

Spool of string

1sp per ft

Sewing

Spool of iron wire

1gp per ft

Metalworking

Sword blank

5gp – 20gp

Metalworking

Tanned leather, Lrg

8sp

Leatherworking

Tanned leather, Sml

3sp

Leatherworking

Tree branch, lrg

2sp

Fletching

Tree branch, sml

1sp

Fletching

Tooling leather, Lrg

5gp

Leatherworking

Tooling leather, Sml

3gp

Leatherworking

Waxed leather thread

5cp per ft

Leatherworking

TABLE OF TOOLS

This table shows the name, price and craft each tool is used for. 

ITEM NAME

WEALTH VALUE

CRAFT

Sewing kit

50sp

Sewing

Leather tools

1gp

Leatherworking

Metal tools

4gp

Metalworking

Maille tools

4gp

Metalworking

Fletching tools

10gp

Fletching

Toolbox (Can contain 3 tool kits)

5gp

Any

Anvil

30gp

Metalworking

Maille mandrel

5sp

Metalworking

Woodaxe

5gp

Fletching

Pickaxe

5gp

Metalworking

TABLE OF RECIPES

This table shows common ‘recipes’ for crafting.

ITEM NAME

MATERIALS

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